8 Best Cat Trackers – We Tested Them All

trackers

Our Review Process

Our reviews are based on extensive research and, when possible, hands-on testing. Each time you make a purchase through one of our independently-chosen links, we’ll receive a percentage of the proceeds. Read more about how we’re supported here.

After researching the market, reading product roundups, scouring customer reviews, and testing eight of the top pet trackers, we’ve chosen the Whistle Go as the best cat tracker you can buy.

This tracker has the longest battery life of any GPS tracker we tried, tracks accurately, and has a feature-rich app for better safety and detailed health tracking. Most importantly, it was the only GPS tracker that performed well in our lost cat simulation.

How We Tested:

  • We purchased 8 of the best cat trackers on the market today
  • We spent a few weeks testing the cat litters on several cats
  • We did not receive these product in exchange for a favorable review, they were purchased with our own money

At A Glance: 8 Best Cat Trackers to Buy

In the comparison table below, we’ve highlighted some of the most important features of each product. You’ll find more detailed information about each product later in the article

ImageProductFeatures
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Top Pick

Whistle Go GPS Tracker
  • One of the most consistent GPS trackers on the market
  • Attaches securely to almost any collar
  • Has the longest battery life of any GPS tracker we tested
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Best without Monthly Fees

Findster Duo+ GPS Pet Tracker
  • Once connected, it can pick up your cat’s signal from up to 3 miles away
  • Doesn’t require a monthly plan
  • Accurate real-time location tracking
Check Price
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Budget Pick

Tractive 3G GPS Pet Tracker
  • Works over any range with no distance limitations
  • Uses virtual fences to keep your cat protected
  • One of the most affordable GPS trackers
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Budget Pick

Loc8tor Tabcat RF Cat Tracker
  • Easy to attach, activate, and use
  • Provides accurate directional information
  • Works both indoors and outside
Check Price
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Best Radio Frequency Cat Tracker

Girafus Pro-Track-Tor RF Finder
  • 1,600-Foot range is exceptional
  • Has a battery life of up to 30 days
  • High level of accuracy
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Best Bluetooth Cat Tracker

Tile Mate Bluetooth Tracker
  • Works both indoors and outside
  • One of the cheapest tracking options you can buy
  • Reliable and accurate for indoor tracking
Check Price
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Best for Indoor Cats

Cat Tailer Bluetooth Cat Tracker
  • A very small, lightweight cat tracker
  • Can help you to find your cat inside the house or yard
  • Extremely easy-to-use app interface
Check Price
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Best Cat Tracker in the UK

Weenect 2
  • Complete tracking system that shows GPS location in real time
  • View activity level, location history, and distance traveled
  • Long battery life up to 72 hours on a single charge
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Our Top Picks Explained

Before We Review The Whistle Go And The Rest Of Our Top Eight Recommendations, Let’s Talk About What To Look For In A Cat Tracker

Reliable, Accurate Tracking Is Essential

Though they’re not a substitute for microchipping and close supervision, cat trackers can help you to keep an eye on your cat when he’s out of sight. With a reliable, accurate tracker, you’ll know when your cat strays from home, where he’s gone, and which direction you need to go to find him.

The best trackers have long battery lives, reliable connections, and ranges large enough to help you find your cat whether he’s lounging on the porch or exploring blocks away.

The Best Trackers Have Functional, Intuitive Apps Or Receivers.

Great trackers make it easy to keep tabs on your cat. Whether in the form of a phone app or a standalone handheld module, receivers should be straightforward and easy to use.

Trackers got extra points for systems that included night lights, behavior change alerts, and other fun features, but some in-app features are indispensable.

For example, GPS tracking apps need virtual fences or safe zones. These alert you when your cat wanders too far from home or out of a designated area. Ideally, these fences are customizable, allowing you to set up safety zones that follow the lines of your backyard or other areas.

They’re Small, Lightweight, And Easily Attach To Your Cat’s Collar Or Harness.

Most cat trackers are made with dogs in mind, so they’re often clunky, heavy, or built into collars without quick-release buckles. Whether designed specifically for cats or not, the best trackers are lightweight enough for your cat’s comfort and compatible with his collar or harness.

Cat Trackers Use One Of Three Tracking Technologies: GPS, Radio Frequency, Or Bluetooth.

GPS Cat Trackers

The Global Positioning System (GPS) is a global navigation system that uses satellites to provide location data to receivers around the planet.

Of the types of cat trackers available, GPS trackers provide the strongest visual location data—they display your cat’s general location on a map—and have the longest detection range of the products on the market. Many GPS trackers can transmit signals to your phone from miles away.

These trackers connect to an app in your phone, through which you can create safe zones, watch your cat’s activity over time, view your cat’s real-time location on a map, and, with some trackers, gain insights into your cat’s health. Some trackers act like fitness trackers, giving you reports about your cat’s daily calorie burn, hours of rest per day, and more.

As exciting as GPS trackers are, they’re not your whizz-bang perfect tracker. Because they rely on satellite transmissions, they don’t work if something is blocking their connection to the sky. GPS trackers don’t work indoors and they might be unreliable under the cover of thick brush, trees, or even heavy clouds.

GPS trackers tend to be larger and heavier than other trackers, so they may be uncomfortable for some cats. Most are rated for cats weighing 8 lbs or more.

GPS trackers are the most expensive type of trackers you can buy, with most costing between $70 and $200. Plus most of them require a data plan, which will cost up to $10 per month.

Radio Frequency (RF) Cat Trackers

RF trackers feature a radio transmitter that attaches to your cat and a receiver that you’ll carry. When the receiver detects your cat’s radio transmission,

it will start beeping and lighting up, telling you that the transmitter is within range. As you move closer to your cat, the signal changes, telling you that you’re headed in the right direction.

While GPS trackers can estimate a cat’s location to within a few yards, a radio frequency tracker will pinpoint your cat’s location down to a few centimeters. These trackers work both indoors and outside and have no problem transmitting through dense undergrowth, floorboards, or walls. They’re lightweight, streamlined, and have long-lasting batteries that should stay strong for months.

But for all the strengths of such a straightforward locating system, RF trackers look like rudimentary tools compared to GPS trackers.

They won’t alert you if your cat goes missing. They won’t give you a visual overlay of your cat’s location on a map. Worst of all, they seldom detect anything further than 1,600 feet away, demanding a slow, steady trial-and-error approach to finding a lost cat.

Most radio frequency cat trackers go for around $100.

Bluetooth Cat Trackers

Bluetooth cat trackers have a few great qualities. They’re cheap, lightweight, and measure battery life in months rather than hours.

But those are the only things they have going for them. Bluetooth trackers are the weakest option available. With a range of no more than 300 feet,

Bluetooth trackers will help you find your cat when she’s hiding under the bed or playing on the deck, but if your cat gets lost, a Bluetooth tracker isn’t usually much more helpful than your own pair of eyes.

After Researching Cat Trackers And Reading Customer Reviews, We Chose The Following Eight Trackers For Hands-on Testing.

Cat Tracker Lineup

Cat Tracker Lineup

Our eight candidates are popular products that have generated a lot of conversation on the web. They include products from all three tracker categories—three GPS trackers, two RF trackers, and two that rely on Bluetooth.

Those eight trackers are:

  1. Findster Duo+ GPS Tracker
  2. Tractive GPS for Dogs and Cats
  3. Whistle GO GPS Tracker
  4. Loc8tor TabCat RF Cat Tracker
  5. Tile Mate
  6. Girafus Pro-Track-Tor RF Cat Tracker
  7. Cat Tailer Bluetooth Cat Tracker
  8. Weenect Cats 2

Best Cat Trackers Comparison Chart

Product NameType of DeviceWeightBattery LifeIncludes App Accuracy LevelPriceWarranty
Whistle GOGPS1.3 ounces 2-15 daysYesHigh$129.951-year
Findster Duo+GPS0.8 ounces 1-5 daysYesHighCheck Here1-year
Tractive 3G Pet TrackerGPS1.76 ounces 2-5 daysYesMidCheck Here1-year
Loc8tor TabcatRadio Frequency6 grams4-12 monthsYesHighCheck Here2-year
Girafus Pro-Track-TorRadio Frequency4.2 gram30 daysYesHigh$114.99N/A
Tile MateBluetooth6.1 grams12 monthsYesLow$59.951-year
Cat TailerBluetooth7.9 grams6 monthsYesLow$59.001-year

After Receiving The Trackers, I Subjected Them To A Series Of Tests

First, I Tested Their Ease Of Assembly And Setup

Ease of Setup

Ease of Setup

I ran a stopwatch while getting the trackers set up.

While assembly, app installation, and setup were effortless, the GPS trackers had the longest wait time before they were ready to use. All of them needed to charge for a few hours before they were ready to work.

On the opposite end of the spectrum, the Tile Mate took the shortest time from unboxing to cat tracking. With a visit to the Google Play store and the press of a button, the Mate was ready to go within a few minutes.

Next, I Let My Cats Try The Trackers On To Test Their Comfort And Security

Cat Comfort Test

Cat Comfort Test

Of our test trackers, only two were made with cats in mind. The others are primarily geared towards dogs, or in the case of the Tile, keys and other inanimate objects.

Like harnesses, collars, and clothes, I was concerned that the tracking devices might overwhelm a feline wearer.

To test the trackers’ comfort and cat-friendliness, I enlisted the help of my two cats, Forest and Wessie. Forest is a 7-lb lightweight, while Wessie weighs 13 lbs. Neither of them wear collars around the house, so I didn’t know how they’d react to having a tracker strapped to their necks.

To my surprise, neither cat seemed to mind—or even notice—the trackers. From the bottle cap-sized Cat Tailer to the clunky 1.2-ounce Tractive, none of the trackers slowed them down.

Were the trackers easy to put on and secure enough to stay attached to a collar?

Whether they used key rings, plastic mounts, or rubber attachment loops, all of the trackers attached securely and easily.

Finally, I Subjected The Trackers To Two Field Tests

Cat Tracker Field Testing 2

Cat Tracker Field Testing

After watching my cats wear their trackers around the house, setting up data plans, and getting familiar with the apps and receivers, it was time to put the trackers to the test. I tested the trackers in a rural, partially-forested area with decent cell coverage.

First, I tested the GPS trackers’ ability to keep track of movement by carrying all three trackers in my pocket and going for a walk.

Because it updated every ten seconds rather than once every couple of minutes, the Findster Duo+ accurately located both the Guardian module and the tracking tag, staying on point during the entire walk.

The two other GPS trackers didn’t update as frequently, so they lost some ground and failed to give an accurate location on the map. While the Findster Duo+ tracked the entire walk accurately, the others were still loading, refreshing, or trying to get a connection.

Tracking Test 1 Side by Side

The Findster Duo+ was the clear winner in this GPS tracker test. But keeping tabs on your cat isn’t always as straightforward as taking a planned walk with your cat outside. I wanted to know what would happen if my cat escaped the house or wandered out of sight while wearing each of the trackers.

To test the trackers’ ability to come to the rescue in a surprise escape scenario, I played a game of cat tracker hide-and-seek.

In this test, one person held the receiver—or smartphone in the case of the GPS trackers—while another played the role of a runaway cat, taking the trackers to secret spots outdoors.

Only three of the trackers were able to locate the “lost cat”. 

The Girafus Pro-Track-Tor and Whistle GO+ did well in this test, each reuniting tracker and receiver within six minutes.

By the time the Tabcat started alerting, I’d already spotted my test partner through the woods. Though it quickly brought me to the target once it was within the 400-foot range, it’s hard to say what would have happened if I’d been searching for a small, frightened cat.

Our two Bluetooth-powered competitors did the worst in this test.  After two minutes out of sight, my testing partner had moved out of the Bluetooth range and I had nothing to work with—they wouldn’t connect until the tracker was within my line of sight. While the Cat Tailer sends notifications when your cat leaves the Bluetooth range, the connection was so inconsistent that I wouldn’t be able to differentiate between a bad connection and a cause for alarm.

Though it worked well in our initial tracking test, the Findster Duo+ simply isn’t made for door dashes. The device is designed for walks, so it doesn’t track your cat unless you’ve started a walk in the app. If you haven’t started a walk, a cat wandering two meters or more from the app will disconnect, leaving you without any way to monitor your cat’s activity.

Best Cat Trackers: Our Top 8 Picks Reviewed

#1 Overall Best: Whistle Go GPS Tracker

Whistle Go GPS Tracker

Buy On Whistle

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Overview:

  • Type of Device: GPS
  • Weight: 1.3 ounces
  • Battery Life: 2-15 days
  • Includes App: Yes
  • Accuracy Level: High
  • Price: $129.95
  • Warranty: 1-year

WhistleGo.Wessie.2

WhistleGo Cat Tracker

The Whistle GO is a GPS tracker that uses AT&T’s cell network, your house’s WiFi, and GPS signals to track and monitor your cat’s movement.

For about $10 more than the Whistle 3, the GO incorporates a range of health-monitoring features like activity tracking, notifications for behavioral changes, weekly wellness reports, and more. Of the trackers we reviewed, the Whistle GO came the closest to acting like a fitness app.

The app, by the way, is user-friendly and functional, allowing you to easily monitor your cat’s current location, start an active tracking session, adjust the GPS refresh rate, view up to four weeks of heatmap activity data, and create customized safe places.

Unlike some GPS trackers that only create circular or square safe places, the Whistle GO gives you all the freedom you need. You can conform the fence to the outline of your oddly-shaped yard or any other shape you want.

In practical terms, the Whistle GO wasn’t perfect, but performed moderately well in all of our tests. With its six-minute default refresh rate, the GPS keeps on top of your cat’s movement even when you’re not tracking. Once I switched it into tracking mode, the Whistle GO started updating more frequently, but it still lagged a bit. In the lost cat simulation, the Whistle GO did everything perfectly—the app sent an alert when the tracker left the safe place and provided an accurate GPS overlay of its location.

Perhaps the Whistle GO’s biggest selling point is its battery life. The Whistle GO’s battery outlasts all of the other GPS trackers in our lineup. While the other trackers needed to retire to the charging station after a week, the Whistle GO was still going strong and, according to Whistle, will last for about 15 days with low activity and three days of high activity.

Overall, with solid performance, unprecedented long battery life, the Whistle GO is an all-around good option for those who want a GPS tracker they can trust.

What We Liked:

  • One of the most consistent GPS trackers on the market
  • Attaches securely to almost any collar
  • Has the longest battery life of any GPS tracker we tested
  • Uses virtual fences to warn you when your cat leaves a safe area
  • Available in a variety of colors

What We Didn’t Like:

  • Requires you to pay for a monthly subscription
  • May be too large for some cats

#2 Best GPS Tracker Without Monthly Fees: Findster Duo+ GPS Pet Tracker

Findster Duo+ GPS Pet Tracker

Buy On GetFindster.com

Overview:

  • Type of Device: GPS
  • Weight: 0.8 ounces
  • Battery Life: 1-5 days
  • Includes App: Yes
  • Accuracy Level: High
  • Warranty: 1-year

FindsterDuo.Wessie

Findster Duo+ GPS Pet Tracker

The Findster Duo+ is an interesting addition to the GPS cat tracker market. With no monthly fees and an extra module that you hang on your keychain, the Duo aims to solve the problems that are common among GPS trackers.

While most GPS trackers rely on a cell connection, MAZE technology gives Findster an independent communication system. Because it doesn’t need cell coverage, you don’t pay a monthly subscription, saving you up to $120 per year. The benefits of MAZE go beyond savings. Unlike most GPS trackers, the Findster works everywhere, from city streets to the wilderness. Its location updating is also lightning-fast, so you can feel confident monitoring your cat’s movement in real time.

In my initial tests of its tracking accuracy, the Findster Duo+ outdid the other two GPS trackers. The Findster’s map updated every few seconds, while the other trackers loaded, lagged, or lost contact.

When it was time to simulate a cat running out the door, the Findster Duo+ fell flat. Because the device is made for walks—you start real-time tracking by hitting the “start walk” button in the app—it doesn’t track your cat unless you tell it to. You can’t start a walk unless your cat’s within 2 meters of the Guardian, so the device can’t help you much if your cat goes for an unexpected walk of his own. You could run your Findster Duo+ in walk mode all the time, but given the resulting drain on the battery, it wouldn’t be a practical choice.

After I connected the modules and started a walk, the Findster Duo+ brought me within 60 feet of the tracker, then started showing the tracking module on the opposite side of the street from its actual location.

To help make up for the looseness of GPS location, the Findster has a secondary tracking feature—radar. A swipe away from the standard map screen, the radar map helps you to identify where your cat is in relation to your smartphone.

Overall, the Findster Duo+ isn’t perfect, but it’s among the best trackers you can buy. If you regularly go for walks with your cat, hate the idea of monthly fees, and are willing to keep up with regularly charging both your phone and tracker, the Duo+ could be a great option.

What We Liked:

  • Once connected, it can pick up your cat’s signal from up to 3 miles away
  • One of the only GPS trackers that doesn’t require a monthly plan
  • MAZE technology updates more frequently than other trackers, giving you accurate real-time location tracking
  • Features a radar tracking screen to help you narrow down your search
  • Works everywhere, including places without cell service

What We Didn’t Like:

  • Only tracks your cat when “on a walk”, limiting you to planned outings
  • A large tracker that may be uncomfortable for small or sensitive cats

#3 Best Budget GPS Tracker: Tractive 3G GPS Pet Tracker

Tractive 3G GPS Pet Tracker

Buy On Tractive.com

Overview:

  • Type of Device: GPS
  • Weight: 1.76 ounces
  • Battery Life: 2-5 days
  • Includes App: Yes
  • Accuracy Level: Mid
  • Price: $32.07
  • Warranty: 1-year

Tractive.Wessie

Tractive 3G GPS Pet Tracker

The Tractive GPS tracker uses AT&T 3G cellular technology to track your cat’s location via GPS. It has all the features we look for in a good GPS tracker, like the ability to create custom fences and receive alerts when your cat strays outside of them.

Its app is functional, intuitive, and readable. One of the interesting functions of the device is a remote-activated LED. When you press a button in the app, a light on the tracker will turn on. This function is helpful when you’re searching for your cat in the dark.

The Tractive says that it updates once every two to sixty minutes in default tracking mode and

every two to three seconds in live mode. The problem, however, is that, depending on your network connectivity, the Tractive may take more than two to three seconds to enter live mode.  Connectivity issues were a constant in our tests.

During our lost cat test, the Tractive lost connection while still within the virtual fence, then failed to update or establish a live connection until 40 minutes later. That was after I’d given up and tracked down my test partners on my own. Once we established a connection, the Tractive worked well, mapping the tracker within a couple dozen feet of its actual location.

Overall, the Tractive had the most inconsistent connectivity of the trackers we tested, making it difficult to initiate live tracking when it mattered most. According to customer reviews, this tracker can work well—especially if you have strong cellular coverage—but it wasn’t a good match for my situation.

What We Liked:

  • Works over any range with no distance limitations
  • Uses virtual fences to keep your cat protected
  • One of the most affordable GPS trackers
  • Has an LED light for finding your cat at night or in dark places

What We Didn’t Like:

  • Only works in areas with cell coverage
  • Tends to take a long time to connect and refresh GPS signal
  • You have to pay for a data plan, which costs at least $5.99 per month
  • Had the shortest battery life of the GPS trackers we tested

#4 Budget Option: Loc8tor Tabcat RF Cat Tracker

Loc8tor Tabcat RF Cat Tracker

Buy On Amazon

Read Customer Reviews

Overview:

  • Type of Device: Radio Frequency
  • Weight: 4.2 grams
  • Battery Life: 4-12 months
  • Includes App: No
  • Accuracy Level: High
  • Price: $99.95
  • Warranty: 2-year

TabCat.Wessie

Loc8tor Tabcat RF Cat Tracker

The Loc8tor Tabcat is a small, lightweight radio frequency tracker that’s made specifically for cats. The tracker module sits in a rubber case and slips onto your cat’s collar, where it transmits to a handheld receiver device.

The handset’s strip of color-coded lights and beeping tone indicates whether you’re in range and how close you are to your cat. One handset pairs with up to four trackers, so it’s easy to outfit your entire fur family with Tabcat trackers.

After a quick activation process, the tracker was ready to use. Using the handset was straightforward and intuitive, proving consistent and accurate in several tests around the house. During outdoor tests, it was less useful. Unlike a GPS tracker, which starts helping you navigate as soon as you’re ready to search, the Tabcat’s 400-foot range means that you’ll have to do some searching on your own before you get a reading.

Once it got into range, however, the Tabcat was spot-on, never failing to give an accurate reading.

What We Liked:

  • Easy to attach, activate, and use
  • Provides accurate directional information
  • One handset works with up to four tracking modules
  • One of the cheapest cat trackers you can buy
  • Works both indoors and outside

What We Didn’t Like:

  • Has a measly 400-foot range

#5 Best Radio Frequency Cat Tracker: Girafus Pro-Track-Tor RF Finder

Girafus Pro-Track-Tor RF Finder

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Read Customer Reviews

Overview:

  • Type of Device: Radio Frequency
  • Weight: 4.2 grams
  • Battery Life: 30 days
  • Includes App: No
  • Accuracy Level: High
  • Price: $114.99
  • Warranty: N/A

ProTrackTor.Wessie

Girafus Pro-Track-Tor RF Finder

The Girafus RF tracker is among the longest-range radio frequency trackers on the market, allowing you to receive signals from up to 1,600 feet away.

Of the trackers we reviewed, the Girafus Pro-Track-Tor demanded the most hands-on assembly time. Between inserting batteries into the tracker and receiver, struggling to snap the case back together, handling tiny screws, and learning how to start a tracking session, it took 18 minutes to put everything together.

The tracker’s silicone case slips over a slim collar—it includes velcro straps for attaching to larger collars—and sits lightly against the neck. Of the trackers we tested, the Girafus had the lowest profile and was best-suited to small cats.

After setup, operating the tracker was straightforward. First, you’ll calibrate the tracker by doing several 360-degree turns. Once the tracker starts picking up a signal, it starts sounding a high-pitched tone and using multicolored lights to indicate the distance between itself and the tracker.

Both indoors and out, the Girafus worked consistently well. In the lost cat simulation, I used it to locate the tracker hidden in the woods and later, when the Bluetooth trackers couldn’t catch a signal, the Girafus Pro-Track-Tor saved the day.

What We Liked:

  • The tracker’s 1,600-foot range is exceptional among RF trackers
  • Has a battery life of up to 30 days
  • Works without any monthly payments
  • High level of accuracy
  • The smallest, most-cat-friendly tracker on this list
  • One handset is compatible with up to 4 trackers

What We Didn’t Like:

  • Some customers say that the battery gets loose inside of the tracker, leading to inconsistent performance
  • The receiver is clunky and won’t fit in smaller pockets

#6 Best Bluetooth Cat Tracker: Tile Mate Bluetooth Tracker

Tile Mate Bluetooth Tracker

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Read Customer Reviews

Overview:

  • Type of Device: Bluetooth
  • Weight: 6.1 grams
  • Battery Life: 12 months
  • Includes App: Yes
  • Accuracy Level: Low
  • Price: $59.95
  • Warranty: N/A

Findster Duo+ GPS Pet Tracker

Findster Duo+ GPS Pet Tracker

Though not designed for pets, the Tile Mate is an all-purpose Bluetooth tracker that helps you locate lost objects. When attached to your cat’s collar, the Tile Mate can help you to find your cat by connecting to any Tile app within 150 feet.

That’s about half the range of our next-most-limited tracker, the Cat Tailer. A 150-foot tracking area could help you to find your cat and give you some degree of confidence, but it’s barely better than your eyes.

In theory, the Tile Mate’s range can expand if it connects to other people’s Tile apps, allowing you to locate your Tile when it comes into the range of any Tile receptor on the planet. It’s reassuring to have the support of the world’s largest lost-and-found community, but not particularly helpful given that you won’t have any idea where your cat went after registering in the Tile system.

While the Tile was reliable and helpful for tracking down cats inside of the house, it didn’t perform so well in our lost cat simulation. The Tile app couldn’t connect and didn’t share any information about where the tracking unit was last seen.

Subscribing to Tile Premium will buy you a few more helpful features, like smart alerts when your cat leaves the range and access to a 30-day location history.

What We Liked:

  • Connects to the Tile user network, which may help you to find your cat if he gets lost
  • One of the cheapest tracking options you can buy
  • Reliable and accurate for indoor tracking
  • Works both indoors and outside

What We Didn’t Like:

  • Tile’s use of location services will drain your phone’s battery
  • Extremely short tracking range makes it almost useless if your cat roams far from home

#7 Best for Indoor Cats: Cat Tailer Bluetooth Cat Tracker

Cat Tailer Bluetooth Cat Tracker

Buy On Amazon

Read Customer Reviews

Overview:

  • Type of Device: Bluetooth
  • Weight: 7.9 grams
  • Battery Life: 6 months
  • Includes App: Yes
  • Accuracy Level: Low
  • Price: $59.00
  • Warranty: 1-year

CatTailer.Forest

Cat Tailer Bluetooth Cat Tracker

This device is the cat-specific equivalent of the Tile Mate. The Tailer looks like a deep bottle cap and weighs about the same amount as one, making it a good option for cats who won’t tolerate anything larger strapped to their neck. Like the Tile tracker, it’s limited to a very small detection range and won’t be of much help if your cat dashes out the door.

The Cat Tailer’s 328-foot range is broad for a Bluetooth tracker, but weak compared to other devices. While it can help you once you enter that range, you’ll still have to wander around your cat’s usual haunts until you pick up a signal.

During outdoor tests, the Tailer wasn’t much more helpful than my eyes and ears, losing connection after my testing partner had been out of sight for two minutes. The interface doesn’t give you directional information, so any distance metrics only give you a radius. You’ll have to use trial-and-error to get on the right path.

Even when I did pick up a signal, the Tailer’s location detection was relatively unreliable.

Even though the tracker was sitting on a shelf, the app fluctuated by about thirty feet between scans—as if the Cat Tailer was jumping back and forth across the room. The Tailer’s connection was unsteady, too, sending notifications that the unit had left the tracking range even though I could reach out and touch it.

The Cat Tailer is best-suited to indoor use and cats who tend to behave predictably outside. As long as you’re able to get within range by searching your cat’s favorite haunts, the 328-foot Bluetooth range can help you to narrow things down.

What We Liked:

  • A very small, lightweight cat tracker ideal for small cats and kittens
  • Extremely easy-to-use app interface
  • Can help you to find your cat inside the house or yard

What We Didn’t Like:

  • One of the smallest detection ranges of any pet tracker on the market
  • Bluetooth signal tends to be inconsistent

#8 Best Cat Tracker in the UK: Weenect 2

Weenect Cats 2

Buy on Weenect.com

Features:

  • Track in real time via smartphone app
  • Includes training module with ring/vibrate features
  • Track all your pets on the same app
NameTypeWeightBatteryAppAccuracyPriceWarranty
Weenect 2GPS25g3 daysYesHigh€49.902-year

Cat wearing tracker

The Weenect 2 is a GPS tracker that enables you to track your cat’s location in real time with no distance limit. No matter where your cat goes, you will always be able to find him.

Priced around €50, the Weenect 2 is an affordable option but you will have to pay an additional monthly subscription fee for use. This device tracks your cat’s location in real time using a multi-network SIM card that allows it to operate even in the countryside. It won’t, however, work if there’s no cellular service available in your area.

In addition to live tracking, the Weenect 2 offers a variety of monitoring features like territory analysis, location history, and time spent sleeping or playing.

If you ever need to find your cat, simply use the smartphone app to view the GPS location of your cat in one of several modes: maps (classic or satellite view), compass, or radar. What we really love about the Weenect 2, however, is that it incorporates a training module so you can teach your cat to return home when called. Using the app, you can vibrate or ring the tracker at mealtime and your cat will learn to associate the two events and come running.

Speaking practically, the Weenect 2 performs well and it stood up to most of the promises made on the website. The 3-day battery life isn’t as long as some of the models we tested and while the device was very lightweight, we can see how it might be a little big on very small cats.
Overall, we were impressed with the Weenect 2 app and the training feature, though we’d love to see a longer battery life. It’s a great option if you want to be know where your cat is at all times.

What We Liked:

  • Complete tracking system that shows GPS location in real time
  • View activity level, location history, and distance traveled
  • Long battery life up to 72 hours on a single charge
  • The world’s smallest GPS tracker for cats, includes multi-network SIM card
  • Silicone case for waterproof protection, fits any collar or harness

What We Didn’t Like:

  • May be too big for some cats to wear comfortably
  • Battery life could be longer, only lasts about 3 days
  • Requires you to purchase a monthly subscription

How Do You Know Which Tracker Is Right For You?

While reading customer reviews, researching the market, and testing trackers with my own cats, the reality of cat trackers was obvious. There is no perfect cat tracker. From GPS to Bluetooth and high-priced to cheap, every tracker has something that will disqualify it for someone.

Think about your cat first—will he be comfortable with a large, heavy GPS tracker? Does he roam far away or are you confident that he’ll stay within the yard? Is he an indoor-only cat but tends to hide in the closet? These questions will help you decide if your cat needs a GPS tracker, RF tracker, or a small-range device that relies on Bluetooth.

Before you make a decision, think about the cell coverage in your area. If it’s spotty, an RF or network-independent tracker might work best. Also factor in the network provider that the tracker uses. If it relies on Verizon, for example, your tracker won’t work in an area that’s not covered by Verizon.

Finally, factor in price. You’ll find trackers of every category at a wide range of prices, so look for one that fits your budget both upfront and over time.

About the author


Mallory Crusta is a writer and adventurecat enthusiast on a mission to make cats’ lives extraordinary. She’s one of the founders of Wildernesscat – a site for happy, healthy, and adventurous cats who are fueled by nature. Visit Wildernesscat for radically natural cat nutrition, home remedies, and lifestyle inspiration.

35 thoughts on “8 Best Cat Trackers – We Tested Them All

    1. Mallory CrustaMallory Crusta

      Hi Laurene,

      That’s a great question and a difficult one to answer. We know that low levels of radiation like those emitted by cat trackers may have harmful effects, but those effects haven’t been established or proven. Without enough information available to give a definitive answer, it looks like the best you can do is decide if the potential benefits of tracking your cat outweigh the potential—and yet unknown—risks of exposing your cat to more radiation.

      Best,

      Mallory

      Reply
  1. AvatarSean Mamo

    hey – great review. just wondering your thoughts between the Loc8tor and the Eureka Technology… reason is they seem very similar however the Eureka give a longer range.

    I was about to purchase the Loc8tor but have seen a few complaints about the range on it.. The Eureka seems to be great too however as a “con” you said the battery life isn’t good.. The battery lasts 3 months which seems decent.

    Any thoughts would be great..

    Reply
    1. Mallory CrustaMallory Crusta

      Hi Sean,

      While the two devices both use RF technology, the Loc8tor has a significantly smaller detection range. It’s limited to just 400 feet. In contrast, the Eureka has a range of 1/2 of a mile up to 2 miles.

      You’re right that the Eureka system does have a decent battery life. According to their FAQ page, the battery lasts for up to 6 weeks and up to 3 days of continuous tracking. The Loc8tor system, however, has an estimated battery life of 4-12 months.

      Altogether, I think the Eureka tracker is a much stronger product and is the one to buy if you’re serious about tracking your cat over long distances. But if tracking range isn’t a priority and you want to save money, the Loc8tor system is the one to try.

      Hope this answers your questions!

      Best,

      Mallory

      Reply
  2. AvatarMarilyn Wickee

    Very helpful thanks. I would like to know how cats adapt, if the devices can come off, or wear down at attachment. Also do the GPS/ Radio Frequencies transmitting all the time harm the cat’s health, or do they heat up like a mobile phone? I like the look of one incorporated in a reflective collar that I saw, but would need to see if it has a quick release in collar.

    Reply
    1. Mallory CrustaMallory Crusta

      Hi Marilyn,

      Thanks for your questions! We just updated the review to include answers to questions like yours. If you’re still in the market for a cat tracker, you may want to check out the updated guide.

      To give you a quick answer, the comfort factor really depends on the tracker and the cat. Both of my cats—one a petite 7 lbs and the other weighing about 13—seemed comfortable with all of the trackers we reviewed. Your cats may react differently. We recommend trackers that attach to your cat’s existing collar rather than those built into a collar. Most tracking collars are made for dogs and therefore don’t have breakaway mechanisms.

      All of them appear to be sturdy and secure with no wear at the attachment point. A breakaway collar, of course, will increase the risk of your cat losing the tracker. It’s worth the safety investment, though, and the tracker should be easy to find if it goes missing.

      Finally, it’s not clear whether or not cat trackers pose a health risk. GPS trackers don’t transmit any EMF, but RF and Bluetooth trackers do emit low levels of radiation. It’s possible—but not confirmed—that this radiation could cause negative health risks. However, those risks are ambiguous and unconfirmed. Remember that trackers don’t transmit signals constantly, so you’re not exposing your cat to constant radiation. Instead, that radiation is usually limited to the duration of your search.

      Hope this helps!

      Best,

      Mallory

      Reply
  3. AvatarDavid Livingston

    RF Trackers. Anyone with a smart phone should be well versed with the GPS system and what it does. What does an RF tracker give you that helps you locate your animal. GPS overlay with Google maps shows you exactly where your target is. Do RF trackers “show” you where the target is or do they point you in the right direction of where the target is by signal strength? I don’t like the expense or battery life / weight / network requirements / over kill of information of the GPS units, but at the same time want something that locates the target with a high percentage of accuracy. Will it tell your target is within 100 ft. and do you have to look though that 100 ft. to find the target or will it guide you to it? Great articular, plenty of info, just no nuts and bolts as to exactly what info the device gives you as information on location.

    Reply
    1. Mallory CrustaMallory Crusta

      Hi David,

      Great question. The article was recently updated to go into more depth on the type of information you’re asking about. To give you a short answer, RF trackers don’t give you visual information on where the target is located. Instead, they use light and sound indicators to point you in the right direction. Again, you’re just listening to beeps and you won’t get a specific distance, i.e. a readout telling you that your cat is “100 feet away”. It’s like playing a game of “Hot and Cold”—the tracker tells you if you’re getting “warmer” until you’re right on target. RF trackers are extremely accurate and consistent, with the ability to pinpoint your cat’s location within a few centimeters.

      Hope this helps!

      Best,

      Mallory

      Reply
  4. AvatarBlair

    Dear Mallory,

    Thanks for such useful information. I wrote to you earlier today via YouTube but wanted to circle back now that I’ve done some further reading. I have narrowed the field to: 1) Eureka Technology MARCOPOLO 2) Girafus Pro-Track-Tor and 3) Whistle GO GPS Tracker and wondered what you thought. My main concern is that my 9 lbs, 13 year old American tabby cat who is accustomed to living inside of an apartment may be curious about leaving our new home which has an indoor/outdoor living design. It’s a big home and the doors will sometimes be open we live by the water so I want a tracker that both tracks well inside the house as well as outside the home should she happen to venture out. But, I’d like to be able to set limits so that she can actually have the freedom to walk out to the yard (but not beyond) and receive an alert if she goes beyond. I don’t want to wait to have to find out that she went. Lastly, since we travel frequently, I would feel most comfortable if we could check in (either on our phone via an app/or directly with the cat sitter/or some other way) and track her whereabouts live. I can imagine that no one device will do all that I’m asking for but wondered if you thought anyone of my top choices might most fill my needs. Our dog passed away this past year so now our lives pretty much revolve around our cat. I couldn’t bear for her to go missing when we move into the new house in a few months.

    Infinite thanks to you!

    Blair

    Reply
    1. Mallory CrustaMallory Crusta

      Hi Blair,

      Sorry about the late reply—it’s good to hear from you again!

      Given this additional information, I’m thinking that the Whistle tracker would be the closest fit. It sounds like it’s vital for you to have some added security while on vacation and neither of the RF trackers will do that. With a radio frequency tracker, you’ll be 100% reliant on your sitter’s ability to notice if your cat’s gone out of sight and use the tracking system on his or her own. It’s a lot better than going without a tracker, but it might not give you the peace of mind you’re hoping for.

      The most comprehensive solution would be to invest in two trackers—a good RF tracker for when you’re at home and want to keep tabs of your cat whether she’s outside or in the house and a GPS tracker for when you’re on vacation.

      Wishing you the best in your search and the move!

      Best,

      Mallory

      Reply
      1. AvatarBlair

        Again, thanks so much Mallory! After much due consideration, I am going to move forward with purchasing the Girafus Pro-Track-Tor for daily use and the Whistle Go Explorer for when we travel just in case she gets out while the cat sitter is on duty. Thanks for your terrific video and advice!

        Reply
  5. Avatarkeld

    came across your review. we are looking for a tracker. our cat is a 24 hours outdoor cat (only take her in case of bad weather). she is not feral she just prefers outdoor. she is a small 9 lbs toitoise.

    we are looking for a tracker where we can see where she goes at nighttime (we don’t think she wanders far – maybe 1500 feet from our house) and also where we can find her when need to, especially if she does not show up for her breakfast or dinner.

    suggestions?

    Reply
    1. Mallory CrustaMallory Crusta

      Hi Keld, thanks for your comment. If you’d like to track your cat’s movement outdoors, a GPS tracker may be the best option for you. In addition to letting you see where she goes at night, a GPS tracker will help you to find her when you need to. We recommend the Whistle GO as a reliable GPS tracker for cats. Hope this helps!

      Reply
  6. AvatarJen Morrill

    Hi Mallory! I have actually kept this page saved on my computer for some time as I keep debating which tracker would work best for me. I have a multi-cat household (usually between 4-6), and they are all primarily indoor cats with access to a fenced in backyard. What spurred my desire to have some kind of tracker was that a few years ago my HOA landscapers went into the backyard and didn’t bother to close the gate behind them. Many of my cats got out of the yard but thankfully all but one returned fairly soon. Sadly, that one completely disappeared, and despite my spending hundreds of hours and dollars over the ensuing months searching for him, I’ve never seen him again, which continues to be heartbreaking. Since then I’ve wished he had had a tracker of some kind, as I may well have gotten him back quickly, and I certainly don’t want that to ever happen again. I’ve already tried a couple of trackers, including the Cat Tailer and the PawScout. My experience with the Cat Tailer was exactly as you described: battery life was great but actual tracking was terrible. I would have a cat right next to me on the couch and it would tell me he was 20 feet away, and it would also keep changing as if he was moving. I just couldn’t see that really helping me find a cat that was actually lost and probably hiding. I loved the tracking ability of the PawScout, but the battery life was ridiculous – often as short as a few days even though they only went around the house, plus it frequently lost tracking ability entirely, again even though the cat hadn’t gone anywhere. So I have eagerly looked through your reviews hoping to find something that will work for us, but there obviously still isn’t a perfect answer. I like the accuracy of GPS trackers but battery life for any of those seems to make them unusable with multiple cats. I really don’t need to track them in the house or yard, it would only be in the case of them actually getting out of the yard. I’ve kind of been leaning toward the Loc8or or the Girafus..? But I would really love to know what you would suggest. Thanks!

    Reply
    1. Mallory CrustaMallory Crusta

      Hi Jen, I’m so glad you decided to come back and leave a comment!

      It’s no surprise that you’d be interested in finding a good tracker after what happened to your cat a few years ago. Based on what you’ve described, I’d agree that an RF tracker like the Loc8tor or Girafus would be your best bet. Either one would probably help you out if one of your cats got out of the yard, but the Girafus will give you a greater range. If you’re looking for something even more powerful, I might think about the Marco Polo tracking system from Eureka Technology. It’s significantly more expensive than the two on this list, but it can pick up a signal from up to 2 miles away—a significant upgrade from anything else on the market.

      Hope this helps you to narrow down your options and brings you a bit closer to finding the tracker that’s right for you.

      Best,

      Mallory

      Reply
  7. AvatarLisa

    What about putting a small gps tracker such as finster and a small rf one on the same collar or harness? Will that interfere with signals?

    Reply
    1. Mallory CrustaMallory Crusta

      Hi Lisa,

      Good question! Doing that wouldn’t interfere with the signals of either tracker and could certainly be a way to fill in the gaps presented by each system. I’d think your biggest concern would be ensuring that your cat is comfortable and not weighed down by both of the trackers on their collar or harness.

      Hope this answers your question!

      Best,

      Mallory

      Reply
  8. AvatarAmy Johnson

    I have a question about the Whistle Go – where did you get the harness it is attached to? They are not for sale on the Whistle website. Thanks!

    Reply
  9. AvatarMay

    Hi! Thanks for great review.
    Have you tested PetFon or know anything reliable compared to ones listed here?

    Reply
    1. Mallory CrustaMallory Crusta

      Hi May, we haven’t tested PetFon or done any in-depth research, but based on a preliminary search, it looks like it could be a good, reliable option with no monthly fees. Other customers seem to like it, too, so I’d definitely consider giving it a try. Hope this helped a bit! – Mallory

      Reply
  10. AvatarKirk

    Why did you not include the Pawtracker it seems to be the best of all of them but nobody is reviewing it?

    Reply
    1. Mallory CrustaMallory Crusta

      Hi Kirk, we weren’t aware of the Pawtracker at the time this review was written, but we will consider it for future updates. Thank you for contributing! – Mallory

      Reply
  11. AvatarJen

    Aww…bummer! I loved this info and your video. Very informative, and I love that you actually tried them all. Unfortunately, I was all set to buy the Girafus one but it’s out of stock at Amazon. 🙁 The Findster looks like an okay option for us if we could go out when the cat does, start the walk, and then go back inside, but I’m not sure if it would keep working then. We don’t want to go on an adventure with our cat; we just want to be able to locate him when he’s away for longer than usual. Oh, well. I’ll keep checking back on Amazon for the Girafus and hope it comes back soon. Thanks for the reviews!

    Reply
    1. Mallory CrustaMallory Crusta

      Hey Jen, thanks for the comment! You may be able to buy the Girafus tracker from their store: https://www.girafus-shop.com/girafus-pro-track-tor-haustier-hund-katze-kleintier-finder-sucher-ortung-mit-varianten/ortung/a-10162
      It’s shipped from Germany and your shipping expense will be higher, but it may be a good solution. Alternatively, there’s another RF tracker not mentioned on this list that seems to be an excellent choice: the Marco Polo tracking system from Eureka technology. It has an outstanding range and a lot of useful features. Here’s a link in case you want to learn more: https://eurekaproducts.com/

      Hope you’re able to find a tracker that works for you and your cat!

      Best,
      Mallory

      Reply
  12. AvatarDan Stein

    Thanks very much for the very thorough reviews! We’ve been wanting a good cat tracker for some time, but I needed help making a decision. Your field tests were exactly what I needed. I especially like the “lost cat” test, which is really the most germane scenario. Our guy disappears for a few days on end, and while we’re not too concerned about his being on an adventure, we really do worry about his being trapped somewhere.

    I bought the Whistle Go from your Amazon link. I hope it works and you get a commission – you deserve it!

    Reply
  13. AvatarSusan Pollich

    Thank you for the in depth reviews. However, I still need your advice. I have a blind cat that comes outside with us inside a fenced in yard. Sometimes I can turn my back for a split second and she jumps the fence. Of course I panic. I’m thinking a GPS model is best because it can alert when she is out of her safe zone. Which would be most reliable and quickest to alert? Then if it takes a minute to see which direction she went in, which is best to locate? She doesn’t go far, but I need everything to be quick.
    I’m thinking the Findstar…..

    Reply
    1. Mallory CrustaMallory Crusta

      Hey Susan, of the GPS trackers reviewed here, I found that the Whistle Go was the fastest to send an alert when my cat left the safe zone. That said, since this article was written, I’ve discovered another tracker that combines multiple technologies to give you alerts when your cat leaves the safe zone while also being able to provide the nuanced locating information of an RF tracker.

      Reply
  14. AvatarAmanda

    Have you tested the Tractive LTE tracker? According to their website, the 3G cat tracker does not work in the US (at least not anymore). I was just wondering if the newer LTE tracker is better or if there is another tracker that is not on the list that you would recommend. I go between two houses in two different states and I am most concerned about finding my cat at my house in CA because he has gotten out a couple of times before. However, there is not great cell coverage and I have a lot of bushes and trees in the backyard and surrounding area so I am not sure how well a standard GPS tracker will work vs an RF tracker. I am hesitant to go with the Whistle Go because it does seem to have a significant amount of negative reviews. Thank you for your article, it has helped a lot.

    Reply
    1. Mallory CrustaMallory Crusta

      Hello Amanda, unfortunately, we haven’t tried the LTE version of the tracker and I can’t comment on the experience. That said, we have since discovered another tracker that seems to perform as well or better than the others on this list: the Pawtrack. This one includes both RF and GPS technology to allow you to find your cat regardless of the environment. This seems like it would be very helpful for your house in California. It’s also well-sized for kitties. Here’s a link for you: https://pawtrack.com/
      Hope this helps!

      Reply

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