6 Best Cat Foods For Pancreatitis

Medically reviewed by JoAnna Pendergrass, DVM
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*This article is for informational purposes only. It’s not intended to be a substitute for professional veterinary advice, diagnosis, or treatment.

The best cat food for cats with chronic pancreatitis is low-residue, palatable, and easy to digest. On our list of the top 6 best foods for cats with pancreatitis, the number one spot goes to Open Farm Homestead Turkey Rustic Blend Wet Food, an ultra-digestible food that’s highly palatable and free from inflammatory ingredients.

Before reading our list of the best products, let’s learn about pancreatitis, how it’s connected to diet, and how to choose the best food for cats with this condition.

At a Glance: Best Cat Foods For Pancreatitis To Buy

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Want a quick look at the products reviewed in this article? In the comparison table below, we’ve highlighted some of the most important features of each product. You’ll find more detailed information about each product later in the article.

Overall Best
10.0
Picked by 31 people today!

Open Farm Homestead Turkey Rustic Blend Wet Food

  • Single source of high-quality animal protein
  • No fillers, animal by-products, or vaguely named ingredients
  • Contains the moisture your cat needs for hydration
Runner Up
10.0
Picked by 31 people today!

Ziwi Peak Lamb Grain-Free Canned Cat Food

  • Made from highly-digestible lamb
  • Contains green tripe
  • An easy-to-eat and palatable food
Best Canned Cat Food
9.8
Picked by 31 people today!

Lotus Just Juicy Venison Stew Grain-Free Canned Cat Food

  • Made from a single animal protein for sensitive cats
  • Free from potentially inflammatory ingredients
  • Highly digestible
Best Freeze-Dried
9.5
Picked by 25 people today!

Stella & Chewy's Freeze-Dried Raw Absolutely Rabbit Dinner Morsels Cat Food

  • Most cats love the taste of rabbit food
  • Made with easy-to-digest rabbit
  • Free from potentially inflammatory ingredients
Budget Pick
9.4
Picked by 21 people today!

Instinct by Nature's Variety Grain-Free Real Duck Recipe Natural Canned Cat Food

  • 95% highly-digestible duck and turkey
  • Free from potentially inflammatory ingredients
  • Supplemented with anti-inflammatory menhaden fish oil
Requires Prescription Approval
9.3
Picked by 18 people today!

Royal Canin Veterinary Diet Gastrointestinal Moderate Calorie Canned Cat Food

  • Formulated for cats with GI inflammation
  • Customer reviews suggest that the food can help cats with pancreatitis
  • Provides EPA and DHA

What Is Pancreatitis?

The term pancreatitis refers to any inflammation of the pancreas. The pancreas is a small, crucial organ that secretes insulin and digestive enzymes, helping your cat to digest their food.

Pancreatic inflammation is most common among cats over the age of 10 and is often comorbid with other inflammatory conditions, particularly inflammatory bowel disease and cholangitis.

The most common symptoms of pancreatitis are lethargy and a loss of appetite. Cats with pancreatitis might also vomit, have stomach pains, run a fever, or demonstrate other symptoms of illness.

Pancreatitis may be acute and appear with severe symptoms or it may be chronic, leading to periodic episodes of mild or moderate discomfort.

What Causes Pancreatitis?

The pancreas secretes insulin and digestive enzymes. Dr. Karen Becker argues that a jcarbohydrate-laden, highly-processed diet places undue stress on the pancreas. After all, it’s the pancreas’ job to produce digestive enzymes and release insulin.

A highly-processed diet doesn’t contain digestive enzymes and typically floods the body with carbohydrates, forcing the pancreas to work overtime in producing enzymes and insulin. Eventually, Dr. Becker and others argue, this diet wears out the pancreas over time.

As compelling as the argument sounds, there’s no proof that a processed diet causes pancreatitis. In fact, it’s extremely difficult to identify what causes pancreatitis in a given patient. The causes of pancreatitis are diverse.

A Few Causes Of Pancreatitis:

  • Pancreas damage caused by intestinal inflammation
  • Physical trauma to the abdomen
  • Infectious diseases, including toxoplasmosis, FIP, and herpesvirus
  • Parasitic infection
  • Hepatic lipidosis
  • Colangitis
  • Drug use, including phenobarbital, catabolic steroids, and diuretics

Qualities Of The Best Cat Food For Pancreatitis

British-Shorthair-Cats-wet-food

During a pancreatitis flare-up, your cat should eat a bland diet.

Cats with pancreatitis may not feel like eating, putting them at a risk for hepatic lipidosis. This condition occurs when a cat doesn’t eat enough and has to metabolize their own fat as energy. Without adequate protein intake, the fat isn’t properly sent into the bloodstream and gathers in the liver, disrupting healthy organ function.

Also Read: Fatty Liver Disease In Cats: Causes, Symptoms, And Treatment

Depending on the cat’s overall health and body condition, hepatic lipidosis can develop after two to ten days of not eating.

Some patients require a feeding tube and fluid therapy, while others suffering from a more mild case of chronic pancreatitis may be able to continue eating on their own. If your cat is vomiting during a flare up, they may need to go on GI rest for a couple of days. Otherwise, do your best to find a food that your cat is willing to eat. Cats with pancreatitis are often inappetent, so this can be a challenge.

Palatable foods that are easy on the GI tract:

  • Meat-based, unseasoned baby food
  • Cooked and unseasoned chicken meat
  • Other unseasoned meats, baked or boiled
  • Bone broth

Visit our guide to the best cat food for sensitive stomachs.

Cats don’t need a low-fat diet.

If you’re familiar with pancreatitis in dogs or people, you’ll know that excessive dietary fat is a common contributor to the condition. Pancreatitis patients are usually encouraged to eat a low-fat diet. Cats are different. In cats, there’s no apparent connection between dietary fat and pancreatitis.

Small, frequent meals are better than big ones.

Forcing your cat to go without eating for long periods of time will trigger hormone spikes, which aren’t good for cats with pancreatitis. Cats with chronic pancreatitis should eat about six small meals a day.

Additional digestive enzymes may help.

Because the pancreas naturally produces digestive enzymes, adding enzymes to your cat’s diet may lighten the burden on their body. Cats naturally ingest digestive enzymes in the GI tracts of their prey.

Though the effects of these enzymes are not well-understood, it’s possible that they can support the pancreas. Digestive enzymes are available in powdered form or as part of your cat’s food. Green tripe is one natural source of digestive enzymes.

In addition to digestive enzymes, you may consider probiotic supplementation. These beneficial organisms may be able to minimize inflammation in the body.

Click here for our guide to the best probiotics for cats.

Avoid inflammatory ingredients.

Since pancreatitis is fundamentally an inflammatory disease, you should avoid any ingredients that might contribute to inflammation. These include carrageenan, added sweeteners, and some artificial colors.

Top 6 Best Cat Foods for Pancreatitis

Because so many cats with pancreatitis also suffer from diabetes and inflammatory bowel disease, the foods on this list are also appropriate for cats with these common comorbidities.

#1 Overall Best: Open Farm Homestead Turkey Rustic Blend Wet Food

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First 5 Ingredients: Humanely Raised Turkey, Turkey Bone Broth, Pumpkin, Carrots, Spinach

If your cat suffers from pancreatitis, he needs a high-quality, easily digestible diet that focuses on animal-based protein and avoids inflammatory ingredients. This Open Farm turkey flavor wet food is a great choice for cats with pancreatitis.

This wet food features humanely raised turkey as the primary ingredient and single source of animal-based protein. Turkey bone broth provides moisture and natural turkey flavor, making this recipe both palatable and easy for your cat to digest.

While this formula does contain several plant-based ingredients, it is free from inflammatory additives like carrageenan and artificial colors or flavors. The total carbohydrate content is only slightly above our recommended 10% maximum and there are no fillers or animal by-products.

Ingredients:

Humanely Raised Turkey, Turkey Bone Broth, Pumpkin, Carrots, Spinach, Red Lentils, Agar Agar, Non-GMO Cranberries, Garbanzo Beans (Chickpeas), Chicory Root, Sunflower Oil, Coconut Oil (preserved with mixed tocopherols), Salt, Vitamin A Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Vitamin E Supplement, D-Calcium Pantothenate, Thiamine Mononitrate, Riboflavin Supplement, Biotin, Folic Acid, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Zinc Amino Acid Chelate, Iron Amino Acid Chelate, Copper Amino Acid Chelate, Manganese Amino Acid Chelate, Sodium Selenite, Dried Kelp, Potassium Chloride, Dandelion Greens, Choline Chloride, Taurine, Turmeric.

Guaranteed Analysis

Crude Protein: 8%
Crude Fat: 6%
Crude Fiber: 2%
Moisture: 82%

Dry Matter Basis

Protein: 44.44%
Fat: 33.33%
Fiber: 11.11%
Carbs: 11.11%

Caloric Weight Basis

Protein: 32.56%
Fat: 59.3%
Carbs: 8.14%

Pros

  • Single source of high-quality animal protein
  • No fillers, animal by-products, or vaguely named ingredients
  • Contains the moisture your cat needs for hydration
  • Made from 100% human-grade, ethically sourced ingredients

Cons

  • Fairly expensive compared to the average cat food
  • Contains several plant-based ingredients

#2 Runner Up: Ziwi Peak Lamb Grain-Free Canned Cat Food Review

ziwi cat lamb

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First 5 Ingredients: Lamb, Lamb Broth, Lamb Liver, Lamb Lung, Lamb Kidney

This lamb-based food is made primarily from species-appropriate meat, providing the nutrition your cat needs in a easy-to-digest format. In addition to lamb muscle meat and organs, the food contains lamb tripe, a source of digestive enzymes that could help to support the pancreas.

It doesn’t contain carrageenan or other ingredients that may contribute to inflammation.

This food is known for digestibility and palatability. According to customer reviews, most cats like the way the food tastes.

Like all Ziwi Peak products, this canned food is expensive, so it isn’t right for every budget.

Guaranteed Analysis

Crude Protein: 9.5%
Crude Fat: 6%
Crude Fiber: 2%
Moisture: 78%
Ash: 3%

Dry Matter Basis

Protein: 43.18%
Fat: 27.27%
Fiber: 9.09%
Carbs: 6.82%

Caloric Weight Basis

Protein: 37.15%
Fat: 56.98%
Carbs: 5.87%

Pros

  • Made from highly-digestible lamb
  • Contains green tripe
  • An easy-to-eat and palatable food
  • Free from artificial ingredients

Cons

  • Expensive
  • Contains chickpeas

#3 Best Canned Cat Food:Lotus Just Juicy Venison Stew Grain-Free Canned Cat Food Review

Lotus Just Juicy Venison Stew Grain-Free Canned Cat Food

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First 5 Ingredients: Venison, Venison Broth, Calcium Lactate, Carrots, Potato Starch

This food is primarily made from venison meat, which is a novel protein for most cats and therefore may help to soothe sensitive stomachs.

It’s a highly-digestible, low-residue food that places minimal strain on your cat’s system.

To help combat inflammation, the food contains omega-3 fatty acids and is free from potential inflammatory ingredients like carrageenan and other unnecessary additives.

On the negative side, the food is expensive and it’s inconsistent. Customers say that some cans contained finely shredded meat, while others contain chunks.

Guaranteed Analysis

Crude Protein: 13%
Crude Fat: 3%
Crude Fiber: 0.5%
Moisture: 78%

Dry Matter Basis

Protein: 59.09%
Fat: 13.64%
Fiber: 2.27%
Carbs: 25%

Caloric Weight Basis

Protein: 50.42%
Fat: 28.25%
Carbs: 21.33%

Pros

  • Made from a single animal protein for sensitive cats
  • Free from potentially inflammatory ingredients
  • Highly digestible
  • Cats love the flavor

Cons

  • Expensive
  • Inconsistent texture

#4 Best Freeze-Dried:Stella & Chewy’s Freeze-Dried Raw Absolutely Rabbit Dinner Morsels Cat Food Review

Stella & Chewy's Freeze Dried Food for Cat

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First 5 Ingredients: Rabbit With Ground Bone, Olive Oil, Pumpkin Seed, Potassium Chloride, Sodium Phosphate Monobasic

Many suggest that pancreatitis patients benefit from a minimally-processed diet rich in the enzymes and nutrients found in raw meat. This freeze-dried food is a convenient alternative to raw meals. It’s made primarily from rabbit, which is a natural part of the feline diet and a highly-digestible source of nutrition.
It’s supplemented with probiotics, which may help to reduce inflammation in the body. The food is free from potentially inflammatory ingredients.

Guaranteed Analysis

Crude Protein: 44%
Crude Fat: 30%
Crude Fiber: 5%
Moisture: 5%

Dry Matter Basis

Protein: 46.32%
Fat: 31.58%
Fiber: 5.26%
Carbs: 16.84%

Caloric Weight Basis

Protein: 33.12%
Fat: 54.84%
Carbs: 12.04%

Pros

  • Most cats love the taste of rabbit food
  • Made with easy-to-digest rabbit
  • Free from potentially inflammatory ingredients

Cons

  • Takes a few minutes to rehydrate

#5 Budget Pick: Instinct by Nature’s Variety Grain-Free Real Duck Recipe Natural Canned Cat Food Review

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First 5 Ingredients: Duck, Turkey Liver, Duck Broth, Ground Flaxseed, Montmorillonite Clay

Duck and turkey constitute 95% of the entire recipe, meaning that it’s easy for cats to digest and utilize. Besides duck and turkey, this food also contains plant ingredients that aren’t necessary or beneficial for an obligate carnivore.

That said, it’s free from potentially inflammatory ingredients like carrageenan, artificial colors, and chemical preservatives. It contains menhaden fish oil, which is a species-appropriate source of anti-inflammatory omega-3 fatty acids.

Guaranteed Analysis

Crude Protein: 9%
Crude Fat: 7%
Crude Fiber: 3%
Moisture: 78%

Dry Matter Basis

Protein: 40.91%
Fat: 31.82%
Fiber: 13.64%
Carbs: 13.64%

Caloric Weight Basis

Protein: 31.03%
Fat: 58.62%
Carbs: 10.34%

Pros

  • 95% highly-digestible duck and turkey
  • Free from potentially inflammatory ingredients
  • Supplemented with anti-inflammatory menhaden fish oil
  • Relatively affordable

Cons

  • Several plant inclusions

#6 Requires Prescription Approval: Royal Canin Veterinary Diet Gastrointestinal Moderate Calorie Canned Cat Food Review

Royal Canin Veterinary Diet Gastrointestinal Moderate Calorie Canned Cat Food

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First 5 Ingredients: Water Sufficient for Processing, Pork By-Product, Chicken, Chicken Liver, Corn Flour

While there aren’t any prescription foods made specifically for pancreatitis, those suffering from the condition may benefit from a prescription GI diet like this one. Prescription diets are seldom made from premium ingredients and are often nutritionally imperfect, but some cats have great success with them.

This food contains some less-than-optimal ingredients like corn flour, modified cornstarch, and powdered cellulose. Despite these nutritional flaws, many reviewers say that it helped their cats with pancreatitis and other inflammatory conditions.

Chewy user “Twink” says that “My wonderful vet put my sweet boy, Bubba on this food, because he’s diabetic, hyperthyroid, and getting over his second bout of pancreatitis. He LOVES this food! I’m so very happy that he’s eating, and it’s agreeing with him! I do wish that it came in more flavors though. I’m worried that he will get sick of it.”

Notably, this is a very low-fat food with about 9.7% minimum protein on a dry matter basis.

Guaranteed Analysis

Crude Protein: 6.5%
Crude Fat: 1.6%
Crude Fiber: 1.7%
Moisture: 83.7%

Dry Matter Basis

Protein: 39.88%
Fat: 9.82%
Fiber: 10.43%
Carbs: 39.88%

Caloric Weight Basis

Protein: 38.49%
Fat: 23.01%
Carbs: 38.49%

Pros

  • Formulated for cats with GI inflammation
  • Customer reviews suggest that the food can help cats with pancreatitis
  • Provides EPA and DHA
  • Contains prebiotics to support healthy gut flora

Cons

  • Contains meat by-products
  • Made with low-value plant ingredients
  • Only available with a prescription

About Mallory Crusta

Mallory is the Head of Content at All About Cats. Having produced and managed multimedia content across several pet-related domains, Mallory is dedicated to ensuring that the information on All About Cats is accurate, clear, and engaging. When she’s not reviewing pet products or editing content, Mallory enjoys skiing, hiking, and trying out new recipes in the kitchen. She has two cats, Wessie and Forest.

30 thoughts on “6 Best Cat Foods For Pancreatitis

  1. Dawn Allmark

    Hi,
    My poor little georgie boy just got his first bout of pancreatitis and it was pretty awful, we almost lost him 🙁 so I`ve been looking for the best foods to give him and his sister (they share food and are 13yrs old) as they move past middle age.
    We live in australia so unfortunately some of the foods listed in your fabulous and helpful blog are not available here (bummer)….Our vet has recommended the Hills ID Digestive care biscuits and chicken stew wet food, but am totally up for any ideas if you have heard of or know of anyone that has a good suggestion?

    Thank you,
    Dawn

    Reply
  2. Mallory Crusta

    Hello Dawn!

    Thanks for your comment.

    I’ve done a little research on brands available in Australia and spotted a few that stand out as potentially good options for your two kitties.

    One is Raw Meow, which offers a freeze-dried raw food made from species-appropriate, ultra-digestible, non-inflammatory ingredients. Their recipes include green-lipped mussels, which may help to maintain your senior cats’ joint health. Quite similar to Raw Meow is Feline Natural, which also offers freeze-dried cat food made primarily from ultra-digestible, non-inflammatory ingredients. Like Raw Meow, their recipes include green-lipped mussels.

    Wellness CORE grain-free canned food is another option, though they do contain a tiny bit more plant matter than the other brands above. It doesn’t sound like your cats have any dental issues, but if they do, they may appreciate Wellness CORE’s line of smooth pates, which have an easy-to-eat texture that’s well-received among cats who are moving past middle age and have the bad teeth to prove it.

    I hope this helps you and your cats!

    Best,

    Mallory

    Reply
  3. Kelly

    Mallory, This is the first time I’ve had the pleasure of benefiting from your site. Thank you so much for sharing the kind of information I really was searching for! I have an older calico with IBS, pancreatitis, minus eight teeth and whoever had her before, declawed all four of her feet. Despite it all, she’s an amazing girl! She likes a lot of gravy on her wet food. I’m having a difficult time finding a food to suit her and her pancreas. We have tried #5 on the list without success. Could you possibly say which of the other four would be the best place to start? Especially since it will mean ordering a case from Chewy. I really want her to feel better. I, too, am disabled. She’s incredibly important, and much loved! Thank you! ~Kelly

    Reply
    1. Mallory Crusta

      Hi Kelly,

      So glad you found the article helpful!

      Since she loves lots of gravy on her wet food, your cat might like the Lotus Just Juicy food on this list. If Lotus doesn’t work out, Weruva is another option. They’re not mentioned on the list, but all Weruva foods are packed with gravy and a hit with most cats. Most of them are very simple and shouldn’t worsen inflammation. Regardless of which food you choose, you might want to add probiotics or digestive enzymes and an omega-3 supplement just to make sure your cat’s not missing out on any anti-inflammatory or digestive benefits.

      I also wanted to mention that Chewy has an extremely friendly return policy. If your cat doesn’t like the food, Chewy will almost certainly give you your money back or allow you to return what’s left in the box.

      Hope your calico kitty feels better soon! She sounds like a gem.

      Best,

      Mallory

      Reply
      1. Sara

        Thank you for the artical. I been reading on pancreatitis last 1h, my cat tiggy has been at the vet since Saturday. I read on another artical that probiotics can lead to death cuz of a study in humans … that scared me what do u think? I give my cats nova probiotics when I’m able to buy it off Amazon it’s for cats dogs. I’m in Canada and I have 8 rescue cats. I was doing dry food with water and canned Food. Dry food I have changed it a few times my cats don’t like much of it , I was giving them a brand called merriet (I can’t spell the name of it) mixed with urinary food (4of my cats have royal urinary food that I WISH they were off it and on better food Ingredients are terrible ) maybe the royal triggered pancreatitis on my cat tiggy I would only add half or less to his meal twice a day. I then switched them this week to open farm salmon food cuz ingredients seem better but j still add wet food and water mixed into it I was slowly switching them.. My cats eat the weruva wet food I was looking for a enzyme on amazon.ca for him would all my cat needed it is it best for all my pets to take enzyme? My cat tiggy also had fluid in his lungs my vet’s done 2xrays his lungs look better today but still has a small bit he does xrays tomorrow and hopefully when I go in to pick up tiggy he’s better wil pass by vet before 7pm. I think he got lung problems from kitty litter tiggy loves being in the litter box room and dust from litter isn’t good. I want to change there litter mid month what dust free littef do u RECCOMAND that’s not overly expensive. . And about food I keep hearing feed raw but I’m not sure how to make raw cat food and supplements even if I Google it seems do complicated. Re a giving a antioxidant like spirulina good for cats dogs. Every extra supplement in Canada seems extra $40+.. I hope I can keep tiggy from never going thru this pancreatitis problems again. I’m assuming My vet well RECCOMAND the wet food from royal for his pancreatitis for now. Tiggg brother corvette passed away in September of pancreatitis it was to late I did blood work on a friday but vet didn’t recommend pancreatitis test then sat he was still sick then we did pancreatitis test Sat didn’t get reeults to Monday a.m and it was to late cuz my sweet boy corvette passed away sun night as I slept it was heart breaking. Do all cat that have pancreatitis get flar ups ? I hope my tiggy doesn’t get it. Thank you for the advice. Gnig it’s very late here in Canada .

        Reply
        1. Mallory Crusta

          Hi Sara,

          There’s a lot to respond to here—I’ll try to touch on all of your main points. Unfortunately, I won’t be able to give you many absolute answers. Pancreatitis is still not very well-understood and there aren’t a lot of tried-and-true solutions. I’m also not a veterinarian, so none of the following ideas are a replacement for veterinary advice.

          First off, we don’t know exactly what causes pancreatitis in cats. It’s almost impossible to say whether or not Tiggy’s diet contributed to his condition. That said, many cats eat Royal Canin’s urinary health foods without any negative effects, so I’m going to venture that it wasn’t a factor. In addition to the products on this list, any simple, meat-based food should be a good option once he’s feeling better.

          You’re right that one study suggested that people taking probiotics had higher mortality rates than those taking a placebo. It’s unclear what caused this effect or if it translates to feline patients. I wouldn’t be too worried about this, though. Especially for your other cats who don’t have pancreatitis, probiotics can do a lot more good than harm.

          As for enzyme supplements, that’s another big question mark. In theory, enzyme supplements should be a good addition to any cat’s diet, but any benefits are hypothetical at this point. Consider using Dr. Mercola’s digestive enzyme supplement, Only Natural Pet’s probiotic and enzyme blend, or the Digest-All supplement from Wholistic Pet Organics.

          There are plenty of dust-free litter products on the market, but I’m not sure that the fluid in Tiggy’s lungs is related to the amount of time he spends in the litter box room. Fluid in the lungs is sometimes associated with pancreatitis and is not a typical symptom of inhaling too much litter dust.

          If you’d like to try a less-dusty litter just in case, here’s our guide to the best dust-free litter you can buy:

          https://allaboutcats.com/best-dust-free-cat-litter

          Finally, not every cat suffers from pancreatitis flare-ups. Some cats have a single bout of acute pancreatitis and never have a problem again. Tiggy may well be one of them.

          I know that pancreatitis is frustrating and scary. It must be especially scary given your experience last September. But it sounds like you’re doing the best you can for Tiggy—rest, veterinary care, and time will have to do the rest.

          Hope this answered your questions.

          Take care,

          Mallory

          Reply
  4. Alyson freegard

    Concerned, I have two cats, one who had a serious episode of pancreatitis two years ago, after a seven day stay at the vets, he came home with Royal Canin gastro low fat food, which he eats with no problem, and hasn’t had another episode. Having two cats, it was difficult to stop either eating the others food, so both ate Royal Canin dried food, as does my dog (retriever, Irish setter) in the last 10 days my dog has had a serious episode of ‘old dog disease’ a neurological disorder (nervous system), that has similar effects to a stroke, rapid eye movement and loss of co-ordonation, he is making a good recovery, my cat (not the pancreatitis) has had a routine check up and dental procedure, which uncovered an ulcer on his tongue, and foot pad dermattisis, I have noticed over the last week, he has been pushing his head into my hand and just resting there, after looking for suitable foot treatments that may help him, I came upon a web site, that suggests this head pressing is related to a neurological disorder (nervous system) with out intending to cause any alarm to any readers, I am wondering why both cat and dog would both be inflicted with nervous system issues! Could their diet be a cause?

    Reply
    1. Mallory Crusta

      Alyson,

      Sorry about the late response!

      I can see why you’d be concerned after having your dog and now your cat exhibit what may be symptoms of neurological issues. It could be a coincidence and your cat might be fine, but if this were happening to my pets, I would want to withdraw the Royal Canin food until I had more answers.

      If you haven’t gone already, it sounds like it’s time for another vet visit. When you go, be sure to note any other symptoms, your cat’s diet, and anything else that’s changed recently. A few things to think about or mention to your veterinarian—do you think this behavior might have any connection to his recent dental procedure? Is he pressing his forehead and crown against your hand or is he pressing another part of his head? Is he also pressing it against walls or other firm surfaces? Is he exhibiting any other symptoms of neurological issues?

      Thank you for sharing what you’ve been going through and I hope your pets are feeling better now.

      Best,

      Mallory

      Reply
  5. Curtis Foster

    Ms. Mallory,

    My girlfriend’s cat has pancreatitis, and vomits at least once a week. She has tried feeding her wet food before, (not sure what kind), and says that she doesn’t seem to like it or eat it. She is currently feeding her Hills prescription diet, but like I said, Lola is still puking on a regular basis. I personally believe that if we offer her a wet food that she likes the taste of, she would eat it. I say that because when we eat in front of her, she often times tries to come eat what we are eating. Do you have any recommendations for a type of wet food or any type of food really that would be a good long term solution for a cat with pancreatitis? Also, from what I’ve read, it sounds like we should be supplementing her food with digestive enzymes. Do you have any recommendations for what type and methods of going about that? Any information would be greatly appreciated!

    Thanks in advance,

    Curtis

    Reply
  6. Mallory Crusta

    Hi Curtis,

    Thanks for reaching out! I agree with your observation on the fact that Lola goes after people food and therefore should be open to eating wet cat food.

    All of the foods listed in this article are good long-term options for a cat with pancreatitis. Most of the products listed come in other flavors that are equally solid choices, so you might want to explore those while using Lola’s people food preferences as a guide. For example, my cat Wessie goes mad over turkey when we have it for Thanksgiving and is an (almost) equally big fan of turkey-based cat food. Also, if she’s resistant to the new food at first, you might try enticing her to it with chunks of cooked turkey, chicken or any other food/treat she loves.

    As for the digestive enzymes, the product I see recommended most often is Dr. Goodpet’s Feline Digestive Enzymes. It’s a tasteless powder that contains protease, amylase, lipase, and cellulase along with the probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus. You’ll sprinkle half a teaspoon onto each cup of food.

    If you want to learn more, here’s a link to Dr. Goodpet’s Feline Digestive Enzymes: http://www.goodpet.com/dogs/digestive-support/feline-digestive-enzymes-4-oz/

    Hope this helps!

    Best,

    Mallory

    Reply
  7. Brenda Dobosenski

    My cat was diagnosed in Jan. with pancreatitis and currently trying to get her weight back up to 9.5 lbs. I am feeding her about 4 cans of Iams purrfect delacacies a day. I feed her every 2 hours due to she is still on the steriod until my vet gets back from maternity leave and I have her stable. My dilemma is that Iams is discontinuing her food and I need to find a quality food for her so I can transition her slowly, the thing is she can’t have poultry. I am in dire need of suggestions

    Reply
    1. Mallory Crusta

      Hi there, Brenda.

      I’m assuming you’ve been feeding her a fish-based variety of Iams Purrfect Delicacies, so you might want to start with fish-based foods. No, they’re not ideal in the long-term, but your cat has to eat and now is not a good time for a hunger strike.

      Tiki Cat has plenty of good fish-based recipes. Tiki Cat tends to be a bit light on fat and calories, so you might want to add in some high-calorie treats or perhaps supplement her diet with beef or pork baby food to keep her weight going in the right direction. If Tiki Cat is out of your price range or not your cat’s style, you might try Fancy Feast Flaked food instead. Fancy Feast isn’t perfect, but it’s far from the worst and has some good qualities, including low carbohydrate content, no carrageenan, no added colors, and high protein content.

      You could also try any of the non-poultry recipes listed in this article.

      Hope this helps!

      Take care,

      Mallory

      Reply
  8. Cynthia

    Our cat, Earl, has pancreatitis and IBS. He’s not a picky eater and currently eats dry food from both Science Diet and Royal Canin for sensitive stomach along with Royal Canin wet food for sensitive stomachs. But he sometimes seems hungry and begs for treats. We’ve been giving Temptations, which our vet said to limit due to fat content. Do you have suggestions for cat treats that would be healthy for him?

    Reply
  9. Claire

    Hi Mallory

    Do you have any advice for cats with pancreatitis and renal disease. My fur buddy has stage 2 renal disease and is on hills dry renal biscuits. Most recent bout of pancreatitis has left him with poor appetite. I was advised to give him a low fat diet which is almost impossible on renal diet which is low in protein but still has relatively high fat content. He won’t eat wet food aside from a small amount of tinned tuna and crab which I’m giving currently just to get him to eat something. Worrying times. Would be really grateful for any advice. We reside in the UK.
    Thank you

    Reply
    1. Mallory Crusta Post author

      Hi Claire, that’s a good question. I’m not a veterinarian, but from what I’ve seen, a low-fat diet necessary is not particularly beneficial for cats with pancreatitis. Therefore, I think that treating your cat’s renal disease while encouraging him to eat should take priority over the pancreatitis. I know these are worrying times and that you have a lot to think about, but I would concentrate first on finding foods that your cat is willing to eat, regardless of how well they fit into a typical pancreatitis-friendly diet. If those diets address your cat’s renal disease, good—but ultimately, just getting in some calories is the top priority. Again, I’m not a vet and it would probably be best to bring these questions to a veterinarian, but I hope this helps to point you in the right direction.
      Best,
      Mallory

      Reply
  10. Holly Cooper

    Hi Mallory,

    Thank you for this Very helpful Information! I’ve been dealing with chronic pancreatitis in my cat Sox for the past two years. His blood work also indicated IBS. He’s a rescue (About 2.5 yrs ago) so I’m not sure of his age or much of his history. My vet recommended science diet wd and id both dry and wet. Over the past couple months his flare ups have been a bit more frequent. He’s on prednisone (for the past 2 years) and any time I’ve tried to taper down he gets worse. I also give him cerrinea (sp?) for nausea and any pain but pain is not always obvious. I sometimes give him Chicken proplan along with Royal canin sensitive stomach (but not the prescription because he didn’t like it at all). It seems like chicken is less upsetting to his stomach and I’ve tried to keep the fat content low and it’s interesting that this may not be that important. I’m wondering if the food needs to be changed – I’m not wild about the science diet and neither is he. What are your thoughts on Fromm food? My vet just retired and I’m wondering if it’s good time to find a cat specific vet. I have IBS myself and a probiotic has helped me alot so I’ll definitely try that along with enzymes to help him. He’s the sweetest cat I’ve ever had and I’ve had cats my whole life. I really want to give him the best Quality of life i can and don’t mind the cost of food if it helps him. Only one of your recommendations included chicken but I’ll try the kiwi also. What are your thoughts on the medication? Would the probiotics and enzymes keep the inflammation and flare ups to a minimum? I realize you’re not a vet but appreciate any recommendations or advice. Thanks! Holly

    Reply
  11. Lynn

    You mentioned that sweeteners can cause pancreatitis flare ups My cat was getting something that had fructose in it everyday for a long time A supplement that I had no idea could harm him.Sounds like this wouldve.He had extremely high pancreatitic enzyme level The highest the vet rech had seen she said.I had him reluctantly euthanized on ironically Mothers Day.I miss him terribly I did everything that I could to keep him healthy and now I think the fructose was essentially poisoning him unfortunately Thankyou for your response re this sweetener.Lynn C.

    Reply
  12. Sara Smith

    Can I just suggest that cats who are picky eaters or anorexic can be fed via a 10ml syringe as long as you get a cat food which can be watered down to a syringeable consistency. I use Hills restorative ad which can be fed like this and so far, it seems OK. My cat will eat it “neat” if the tin is freshly opened but the rest of the tin contents need to be fed about 20-30ml at a mealtime by syringe. Downside is it’s not especially cheap but petdrugsonline sell it cheaper than your vet will. Good luck to all struggling to keep weight on your kitty!

    Reply
  13. Lexi picky cat owner

    Hi Mallory!!! This is the first time I’ve had the pleasure of checking out your site. I can’t say enough how thankful I am for the information I’ve found in the last hour. My 11 yr old cat Tabby was diagnosed with pancreatitis three years ago. I saw your post on the top 5 best food for pancreatitis but unfortunately Tabby will not eat wet food of any kind. She is extremely picky and won’t touch anything wet, not even wet treats like the freeze dried chicken from Purebites. I’m wondering if there are any dry food brands you have come across that will help reduce flare ups. The vet has recommended a science diet dry food but I’m hoping better food exists. Thank you so much for your time 🙂

    Reply
    1. Mallory Crusta Post author

      Hello there! Thank you for stopping by. I’m delighted to hear that you’ve found our site helpful. As for the best cat food for your kitty with pancreatitis, I’d generally recommend something that follows the same nutritional rules seen in the foods recommended here. Look for something nutrient-dense and highly-digestible. Many of the options on our list of the best dry cat food may be promising options. Again, this is not veterinary advice, but digestibility seems to be the most important factor when choosing good food for a cat with pancreatitis. Hope this helps! – Mallory

      Reply
  14. Lisa West

    Hello Mallory! This was a terrific article with perfect timing. My 11 yo, Sugarbee, was diagnosed a few days ago with pancreatitis and inflammatory bowel. My question; can you recommend a venison wet food recipe that I can make my self, or, send me to a site you approve of? Also, are scrambled or raw eggs ok? I live in upstate NY and our whitetail deer population is huge, i think venison would be the easiest and least expensive option. I’m also pretty darn handy in the kitchen lol! Thank you!?

    Reply
    1. Mallory Crusta Post author

      Hi Lisa, thanks for commenting! Unfortunately, I don’t have a good venison recipe for you, but the team at IBDKitties may have some advice for you. As for scrambled and raw eggs, both are okay! We have an article on the safety of eggs for cats here. Sorry I couldn’t be of more help, but I hope this points you in a productive direction.

      Reply
  15. Amy Stanley

    Thank you for the helpful information and recommendations. My cat is recently diagnosed with Pancreatitis at levels starting at 16 and now down to 14. She is completely healthy otherwise and still eating good but the vet is having me start with changing her diet. Your article was very informative. Are there any other new foods your would recommend?

    Reply
    1. Mallory Crusta Post author

      Hi Amy, thank you for commenting! We don’t have any updated recommendations at this time, but in general, a straightforward, meat-based diet that is highly-digestible is going to be your best bet. In addition to the recommendations here, you might appreciate some of the options listed in our article on the best cat food for IBD, which seems to respond well to a similar type of food: https://allaboutcats.com/ibd-in-cats
      Of course, this is not veterinary advice and I’d encourage you to consult your veterinarian before you make a final decision.
      Hope this helps!

      Reply
  16. Carolyn K.

    My cat was just diagnosed with diabetes. I truly believe the diabetes stems from issues with his pancreas not functioning properly as he had a severe bout of pancreatitis 2 years ago and almost died. But I feel like I’m just treating a symptom, albeit a dangerous symptom that certainly needs treatment. He is a finicky eater and is very underweight. I found out he likes hamburger meat when I was making hamburgers a week ago and gave him a little taste. He went crazy and was climbing up my leg for more. Is it safe to feed him hamburger meat? He does like canned chicken breast. Is that a good option? I will also try out the foods recommended in this article.
    Thank you so much for your input. This article is very helpful.

    Reply
    1. Mallory Crusta Post author

      Hi Carolyn, is the hamburger meat raw or cooked? Raw ground meat is more likely to be contaminated with pathogens that may harm your cat. As long as it’s cooked, I believe that the meat should be an acceptable treat, but I would recommend consulting with your veterinarian before deciding whether or not you want to continue giving your cat this food. All the best! – Mallory

      Reply

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