What Colors Do Cats Like?

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Your cat has favorite foods, favorite toys, and probably has a preferred place to take a snooze. They have emotions and opinions that are as valid as anyone else’s in the family. But have you ever wondered if your cat has a favorite color?

So can cats see colors like humans? Well, for humans, favorite colors are completely subjective. It’s hard to say what attracts a certain person to a certain color.

When it comes to cats, however, the meaning behind a favorite color might be more biological than emotional. It’s about feline vision and how cats see the world differently than humans.

Before you can take a guess at your cat’s favorite color, you have to understand a few facts about feline vision.

what colors do cats like

The old belief that cats and dogs see the world in shades of black, white, and gray is not true. Scientists have since learned that cats have deuteranomaly.

Are Cats Colorblind?

The old belief that cats and dogs see the world in shades of black, white, and gray is not true. Scientists have since learned that cats have deuteranomaly. This means that they are essentially red-green color blind. Many humans also have this vision deficiency, but it rarely affects everyday life.

Cats can’t discern between red, orange, pink, and some shades of brown. Their eyes can, however, depict colors in the blue/violet range and green/yellow. Other shades on the color spectrum appear dull or slightly “off.” How a cat views a specific color depends on how much blue or green is used to make that color.

For example, the color purple is made by mixing red and blue. Cats can’t see red, so purple looks like a shade of blue. Colors that don’t contain any blue or green, like red, appear gray. Orange, which is made from red and yellow, also appears as a shade of gray.

what colors do cats like?

When faced with a pile of toys in all kinds of colors, the blue toys will stand out the most to your cat.

A Cat’s Favorite Color

You have to be able to see a color for it to be your favorite, so we can safely rule out red, orange, brown, purple, and those other shades that your cat sees as similar shades of gray.

While there still might be an emotional element we’re not aware of, most researchers suggest that a cat’s favorite color is blue. This is because blue is the color that cats see most clearly. They can also see yellowy-green colors well, so those shades might also be in the running for your cat’s favorite.

When faced with a pile of toys in all kinds of colors, the blue toys will stand out the most to your cat. The same goes for blue blankets, pillows, and clothing. It’s also believed that colors in the blue spectrum evoke a sense of calm.

Animal Wellness Magazine reports that every color has a measurable vibrational frequency. These subtle vibrations affect the body in different ways and can even be used to promote healing and relaxation. Cool colors, including blue, are believed to have a calming effect on cats, dogs, and even humans.

what colors do cats like?

Scientists speculate based on feline vision, however, that cats might feel anxious or uneasy with bright white.

Are There Colors That Cats Hate?

While cats are likely attracted to the color blue, are there other colors that summon more negative emotions? There are no reliable scientific studies on the topic, but anecdotal evidence suggests cats don’t typically have negative emotions when it comes to color.

Scientists speculate based on feline vision, however, that cats might feel anxious or uneasy with bright white.

While cats see fewer colors than humans, they surpass us when it comes to seeing in low light conditions. The photoreceptors in the feline retina allow them to see clearly with about 20% less light than what a human would need. They can’t see in pitch black, but their exceptional night vision allows them to hunt and navigate in the dark.

tuxedo cat playing

During the day, that light sensitivity doesn’t turn off. Their retinas still collect more light than what a human’s does, and this can make the color white seem especially bright.

It’s theorized that a bright white wall, article of clothing, sofa, etc, will appear to glow in the eyes of a cat. This would be understandably disconcerting and irritating if you’re surrounded by glowing color and can’t get away.

For this reason, veterinary offices and animal shelters don’t usually paint their walls white. A nice pastel shade of blue is much more appealing to animal eyes.

We can’t ask our cats for their favorite color and get a clear answer, but biology gives us a hint as to what color they prefer. To test the theory, try offering your cat multiple toys, blankets, or pillows in different colors. Do this experiment multiple times and keep track of which objects your cat chooses. You might be surprised to see a pattern emerge.

what colors do cats like?

We can’t ask our cats for their favorite color and get a clear answer, but biology gives us a hint as to what color they prefer.

Frequently Asked Questions

Do cats like the color green

Most researchers suggest that a cat’s favorite color is actually the color blue. This is due to the fact that blue is the color that cats see most clearly. They can also see yellowy-green colors well

Are cats color blind like dogs?

Scientists have since learned that cats have deuteranomaly. Much like with dogs this means that they are essentially red-green color blind

Do cats like the color red?

Cats can't really see red color per say. They can’t discern between colors like red, orange, pink, and some shades of brown.

Do cats like the color orange?

For cats, colors that don’t contain any blue or green, like orange, appear gray. Orange, which is made from red and yellow, also appears as a shade of gray.

View Sources

https://animalwellnessmagazine.com/color-therapy/

https://www.theshokoshow.com/why-your-cat-hates-the-vet/

https://www.healthline.com/health/deuteranopia

About Amber King

Amber's pet writing career started when her strong-willed and understandably anxious rescue dog, Copper, inspired her to write about her experiences training and loving such a beloved family member. Since then, she has welcomed more dogs, cats, foster cats, and chickens into her life. She uses her experiences with her own pets as well as lessons learned by volunteering with animal shelters to help other pet people better understand and care for their furry best friends.

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