Stella & Chewy’s Cat Food Review

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Our Review Process

Our reviews are based on extensive research and, when possible, hands-on testing. Each time you make a purchase through one of our independently-chosen links, we’ll receive a percentage of the proceeds. Read more about how we’re supported here.

Stella & Chewy’s is a leader in the frozen and freeze-dried raw cat food space, but is it a safe, healthy choice for your cat? Find out in our unbiased Stella & Chewy’s cat food review.

The We’re All About Cats Standard—Rating Stella & Chewy’s on What Matters

We’ve analyzed Stella & Chewy’s and graded it according to the We’re All About Cats standard, evaluating the brand on species-appropriateness, ingredient quality, product variety, price, customer experience, and recall history. Here’s how it rates in each of these six key areas.

Ratings

  • Species-Appropriateness – 9/10
  • Ingredient Quality – 8/10
  • Product Variety – 8/10
  • Price – 5/10
  • Customer Experience – 5/10
  • Recall History – 4/10

Overall Score: 6.5/10

We give Stella & Chewy’s cat food a 39 out of 60 rating or a B- grade.

As part of our review process, we’ve submitted samples to an independent lab. You can see the full report here and here.

In addition to performing our own qualitative analysis of the brands reviewed here, we submitted samples for analysis at an ISO 17025 certified food testing and analysis lab.

We bought the products at full retail price, and the entire testing process was funded by All About Cats without direct input or influence from the companies involved.

Analytical testing in a food chemistry lab gives us the exact macronutrient and micronutrient content of each recipe. The tests also look at microbial content, yeast, mold, and heavy metals, helping you ensure that you’re only putting the best in your cat’s bowl.

To access the lab reports for each food reviewed here, click the “view lab report” link in the product review.

About Stella & Chewy’s

The Stella & Chewy’s story starts in 2003, shortly after company founder Marie Moody adopted an Airedale-Shar-Pei mix named Chewy. After Chewy was diagnosed with distemper, Marie started preparing a raw diet for both Chewy and her other dog, Stella. In between jobs and inspired by the way her pups thrived on a fresh diet, she started delivering homemade raw food to pet guardians around New York City.

The raw food was a hit with New York pet people and soon Stella & Chewy’s was one of the best-known raw pet food companies in the industry.

Sourcing And Manufacturing

Stella & Chewy’s foods are made in the company’s FDA-inspected facility located in the Milwaukee, Wisconsin area.

The company sources ingredients from countries including—but not limited to—North America, New Zealand, and Australia. All of their fruits and vegetables are certified organic and sourced from either North or South America, depending on availability. Stella & Chewy’s doesn’t source any ingredients from China.

All of their foods are made using a patented food safety process the company calls SecureByNature®. This process involves high-pressure processing, which is a low-temperature process that leaves the food’s color, texture, flavor, and nutrient value intact while destroying pathogenic organisms.

After production, all Stella & Chewy’s products are subjected to testing by an independent lab. If you’d like to see the results for yourself, you can enter your Stella & Chewy’s product lot code and find the specific product’s safety results.

Has Stella & Chewy’s Cat Food Been Recalled?

Stella & Chewy’s was recalled twice in 2015. Both recalls were due to potential listeria contamination and affected food for both dogs and cats.

What Kinds Of Cat Food Does Stella & Chewy’s Offer?

Stella & Chewy’s cat food selection includes frozen raw morsels, frozen raw medallions, freeze-dried morsels, wet food morsels, and wet food paté.

  • Perhaps the brand’s most popular offering is its freeze-dried dinner morsels. These are kibble-style chunks of freeze-dried meat that you rehydrate and serve. All of their freeze-dried foods are 98% muscle meat, organs, and bones.
  • Stella & Chewy’s frozen raw morsels are chunks of frozen raw meat.
  • Stella & Chewy’s mini medallions are patties of shredded raw meat. There are currently just two recipes—chicken and turkey.
  • For those interested in a more traditional meal, Stella & Chewy’s offers two types of wet food. Their Marvelous Morsels feature morsels of meat in bone broth and are available in three flavors—chicken, chicken & salmon, and turkey. Purrfect Paté is a smooth food that’s also soaked in bone broth. It’s available in the same three flavors.

Stella & Chewy’s Cat Food – Top 3 Recipes Reviewed

Product Name Food Type Price per Ounce Our Grade
Stella & Chewy’s Chick Chick Chicken Dinner Morsels Freeze-Dried $2.11 B
Stella & Chewy’s Duck Duck Goose Dinner Morsels Freeze-Dried $2.11 B
Stella & Chewy’s Tummy Ticklin’ Turkey Dinner Morsels Freeze-Dried $1.93 B

#1 Stella & Chewy’s Chick Chick Chicken Dinner Morsels Freeze-Dried Raw Cat Food Review

Stella & Chewy's Chick Chick Chicken Dinner Morsels Freeze-Dried Raw Cat Food

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View Lab Report

Chicken appears to be the primary protein source in this freeze-dried cat food.

Like all Stella & Chewy’s freeze-dried foods, the product is 98% muscle meat, organs, and bones. It incorporates a combination of ground chicken with bones, chicken liver, and chicken gizzard—an organ sometimes called a second stomach that’s partially responsible for grinding up food before it passes through the digestive tract.

The remaining 2% of the recipe is composed of nutraceuticals and supplements. The first is pumpkin seed, presumably as a source of fiber. The food also contains fenugreek seed, dandelion, and dried kelp as natural sources of vitamins and minerals.

The food contains a variety of synthetic vitamins, minerals, and amino acids to make it nutritionally complete and balanced.

Overall, this food is high in protein with moderate fat and low carbohydrate content.

The food has 123 calories per ounce.

Ingredients

Chicken (Ground With Bone), Chicken Liver, Chicken Gizzard, Pumpkin Seed, Potassium Chloride, Sodium Phosphate, Choline Chloride, Fenugreek Seed, Dried Pediococcus Acidilactici Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus Acidophilus Fermentation Product, Dried Bifidobacterium Longum Fermentation Product, Dried Bacillus Coagulans Fermentation Product, Taurine, Tocopherols (Preservative), Dandelion, Dried Kelp, Zinc Proteinate, Iron Proteinate, Vitamin A Supplement, Vitamin E Supplement, Niacin Supplement, Copper Proteinate, Riboflavin Supplement, Sodium Selenite, D-Calcium Pantothenate, Biotin, Manganese Proteinate, Thiamine Mononitrate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Folic Acid, Vitamin B12 Supplement.

Guaranteed Analysis

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Crude Protein: 45%
Crude Fat: 25%
Crude Fiber: 5%
Moisture: 5%
Ash: 4.37%

Dry Matter Basis

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Protein: 47.37%
Fat: 26.32%
Fiber: 5.26%
Carbs: 16.45%

Caloric Weight Basis

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Protein: 37.08%
Fat: 50.03%
Carbs: 12.88%

Ingredients We Liked: Ground Chicken with Bone, Chicken Liver, Chicken Gizzard

Ingredients We Didn’t Like: None

Common Allergens: Chicken

Pros

  • 98% of the total recipe consists of meat, organs, and bones
  • Rich in animal protein
  • Free of animal by-products
  • Made without artificial colors, flavors, and preservatives

Cons

  • May have too much bone

#2 Stella & Chewy’s Duck Duck Goose Dinner Morsels Freeze-Dried Raw Cat Food Review

Stella & Chewy's Freeze-Dried Raw Duck Duck Goose Dinner Morsels Grain-Free Cat Food, 18 oz Size:18 Oun

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Duck appears to be the primary protein source in this freeze-dried cat food.

Like all Stella & Chewy’s freeze-dried dinner morsels, this food is meat-based and composed of 98% muscle meat, organs, and bones. It’s made from duck meat and bones, turkey meat and bones, turkey liver, goose, and turkey gizzard.

This blend of poultry ingredients is accented by a blend of supplemental plant ingredients, including pumpkin seed, probiotics, dandelion, and dried kelp.  All of the fruits and vegetables in the food are 100% certified organic.

A variety of synthetic vitamins, minerals, and amino acids make it nutritionally complete.

Overall, the food is high in protein with moderate fat and low carbohydrate content.

The food has 149 calories per ounce.

Ingredients

Duck With Ground Bone, Turkey With Ground Bone, Turkey Liver, Goose, Turkey Gizzard, Pumpkin Seed, Potassium Chloride, Sodium Phosphate, Choline Chloride, Dried Pediococcus Acidilactici Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus Acidophilus Fermentation Product, Dried Bifidobacterium Longum Fermentation Product, Dried Bacillus Coagulans Fermentation Product, Taurine, Tocopherols (Preservative), Dandelion, Dried Kelp, Zinc Proteinate, Iron Proteinate, Vitamin A Supplement, Vitamin E Supplement, Niacin Supplement, Copper Proteinate, Riboflavin Supplement, Sodium Selenite, D-Calcium Pantothenate, Biotin, Manganese Proteinate, Thiamine Mononitrate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Folic Acid, Vitamin B12 Supplement.

Guaranteed Analysis

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Crude Protein: 40%
Crude Fat: 30%
Crude Fiber: 5%
Moisture: 5%
Ash: 2.79%

Dry Matter Basis

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Protein: 42.11%
Fat: 31.58%
Fiber: 5.26%
Carbs: 18.12%

Caloric Weight Basis

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Protein: 30.75%
Fat: 56.02%
Carbs: 13.23%

Ingredients We Liked: Duck with Ground Bone, Turkey with Ground Bone, Turkey Liver, Goose, Turkey Gizzard

Ingredients We Didn’t Like: None

Common Allergens: None

Pros

  • Contains named meats instead of vaguely-labeled meals and by-products
  • Contains a combination of muscle and organ meats
  • Primarily made from meat rather than plant ingredients
  • Free of artificial colors, flavors, and preservatives
  • Low carbohydrate content

Cons

  • May be too high in bone

#3 Stella & Chewy’s Tummy Ticklin’ Turkey Dinner Morsels Freeze-Dried Raw Cat Food Review

Stella & Chewy's Tummy Ticklin' Turkey Dinner Morsels Freeze-Dried Raw Cat Food

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Turkey appears to be the primary protein source in this freeze-dried cat food.

Like the other products on this list, this recipe is a freeze-dried food made with 98% meat, organs, and bones. This time turkey is the meat of choice, ground with bones and mixed with turkey liver and gizzard.

In accordance with Stella & Chewy’s usual formula, the food contains pumpkin seed as a source of fiber and trace nutrients along with probiotics, dandelion, and dried kelp.

The food is fortified with vitamins, minerals, and amino acids to make it nutritionally complete and balanced.

Overall, this food is rich in protein with moderate fat and low carbohydrate content.

The food has 139 calories per ounce.

Ingredients

Turkey With Ground Bone, Turkey Liver, Turkey Gizzard, Pumpkin Seed, Potassium Chloride, Sodium Phosphate, Choline Chloride, Dried Pediococcus Acidilactici Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus Acidophilus Fermentation Product, Dried Bifidobacterium Longum Fermentation Product, Dried Bacillus Coagulans Fermentation Product, Taurine, Tocopherols (Preservative), Dandelion, Dried Kelp, Zinc Proteinate, Iron Proteinate, Vitamin A Supplement, Vitamin E Supplement, Niacin Supplement, Copper Proteinate, Riboflavin Supplement, Sodium Selenite, D-Calcium Pantothenate, Biotin, Manganese Proteinate, Thiamine Mononitrate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Folic Acid, Vitamin B12 Supplement.

Guaranteed Analysis

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Crude Protein: 40%
Crude Fat: 37%
Crude Fiber: 5%
Moisture: 5%
Ash: 3.01%

Dry Matter Basis

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Protein: 42.11%
Fat: 38.95%
Fiber: 5.26%
Carbs: 10.52%

Caloric Weight Basis

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Protein: 28.6%
Fat: 64.25%
Carbs: 7.14%

Ingredients We Liked: Turkey with Ground Bone, Turkey Liver, Turkey Gizzard

Ingredients We Didn’t Like: None

Common Allergens: None

Pros

  • Made primarily from meat, organs, and bones with minimal plant content
  • Free of animal by-products
  • Rich in protein
  • Free of potentially-harmful additives
  • Low carbohydrate content

Cons

  • May have too much bone matter

What Do Customers Think Of Stella & Chewy’s Cat Food?

Stella & Chewy’s cat food product listings receive almost exclusively positive reviews, with most customers saying their cats loved the food. Some say it helped to improve their cats’ health.

Excessive bone content is the top complaint about Stella & Chewy’s cat food. Like some other makers of raw and freeze-dried food, Stella & Chewy’s cat food contains ground bone. Some say they use too much. Too much bone increases the food’s mineral content, including magnesium, calcium, and phosphorus.

According to a guide on the Raw Feeding Community website, a whole chicken is about 27-32% bone, while a typical prey animal like a mouse or rabbit is closer to 5-10% bone. Stella & Chewy’s doesn’t disclose how much bone content is each of their recipes, but they do reveal the foods’ phosphorus content.

The company claims that all of their freeze-dried and frozen foods have the same phosphorus content. That’s 0.45% to 0.67% on an as-fed basis. Tummy Ticklin’ Turkey frozen raw food, for example, is 0.61% phosphorus on an as-fed basis. This translates to roughly 3.9g per 1000 calories. That’s twice the AAFCO’s recommended amount for growing kittens.

Stella & Chewy’s has another problem—a lack of transparency and an unwillingness to provide valuable information to their customers.

As a cat food reviewer, I’ve contacted numerous companies asking for typical values of certain nutrients—protein, fat, carbohydrates, ash, and moisture. So far, every company has been more or less willing to share these values. When I contacted Stella & Chewy’s, the customer support representative refused to share this basic information.

I’m not alone in this experience. These Feline Diabetes forum users are also frustrated by Stella & Chewy’s refusal to share important nutritional information.

Dr. Lisa Pierson, DVM has spent hundreds of hours gathering this type of information to add to her extensive cat food chart. Cat food brands from Tiki Cat to Fancy Feast have willingly provided typical nutrient data, helping people around the world understand what’s in their cat’s food. When Dr. Pierson contacted Stella & Chewy’s requesting typical nutrient analysis data for her cat food chart, they demanded that she sign a confidentiality agreement before providing it.

Regardless of what Stella & Chewy’s tells customers, the typical nutrient analysis is not a trade secret. Many companies share it on their website for anyone to read. It’s the same information that we expect from every “Nutrition Facts” label on our own food.

Positive Reviews

“I have struggled to find a food that doesn’t cause my cat intestinal discomfort. I recently found Stella and Chewys and made the switch, and I’m so glad we did. My cat hasn’t had a single problem since. Not only is the food much easier on her digestive system, but she loves it. She’s yelling for her dinner the minute I get home. It’s well-worth the price for us to see her so much more comfortable and happy.” –  Jenna, reviewing Stella & Chewy’s Tummy Ticklin’ Turkey Dinner Morsels

“My bengal cat loves the duck! We give him 11 morsels in the morning and 11 morsels in the evening with dry kibble in between. It is easier to prepare when we crush them up before adding water. Takes just a minute and it’s ready to go! I like the fact that it is a raw diet but is also convenient.”Pwhited813, reviewing Duck Duck Goose Dinner Morsels

Negative Reviews

“I keep reading about the benefits of raw, and this freeze-dried product seemed like a good idea. It’s competitively priced considering the quality of the ingredients, so I figured I’d give it a try as a topper. My guys, all 3 of them, seem to love it. But then I realized that the phosphorous count is more than double their regular canned food! The phosphorous comes from a natural source — bone meal and yes cats need phosphorous in their diet and would naturally eat the bones of prey, but I’m afraid the amount is not balanced. Bone meal is high up on the ingredients list. I don’t really feel like this is safe for my cats’kidneys long term. I would consider it if they changed the formula and had a lower phosphorous count. Just because something is natural, that doesn’t mean it’s healthy.” Marioninnyc, reviewing Stella & Chewy’s Chick Chick Chicken Dinner Morsels

“This food is reliable, but not predictable – huh? My cat has eaten this food for several years, but I can never trust the formula – in one bag, the little pellets will be firm and well formed; but in the next bag, the pellets will be nothing more than petfood “chaf / dust”. very frustrating.”Patricia, reviewing Stella & Chewy’s Duck Duck Goose Dinner Morsels

How Much Does Stella & Chewy’s Cat Food Cost?

Stella & Chewy’s freeze-dried cat food costs between $2 and $3 per ounce, but since the food is so light, it’s misleading to use price per ounce as your only measurement. Instead, let’s think in terms of cost per day. By evaluating the food’s cost by price per day, we can compare it to other products.

According to the company’s feeding instructions for a 10-lb cat, it would cost approximately $2.53 per day to feed your cat Stella & Chewy’s freeze-dried cat food.

Overall, Is Stella & Chewy’s A Good Choice?

Stella & Chewy’s is a leading option for those interested in feeding a raw or freeze-dried diet. Their recipes deliver straightforward, meat-first nutrition without unnecessary additives or carbohydrate content.

However, their frozen and freeze-dried raw foods appear to contain too much bone. Because they contain so much bone, Stella & Chewy’s freeze-dried and frozen raw foods tend to be high in phosphorus and may not be a good choice for cats with kidney disease or those trying to minimize their cats’ phosphorus intake for any other reason.

This issue, combined with the company’s lack of transparency, are things to consider before choosing Stella & Chewy’s as your cat’s new food.

Where To Buy Stella & Chewy’s Cat Food?

While most of their selection is sold online, you can only buy Stella & Chewy’s frozen and wet foods at local pet stores—they’re not available through any online retailers. The rest of the Stella & Chewy’s lineup is available on Amazon, Chewy, PetFlow, and Only Natural Pet.

Click here to shop for Stella & Chewy’s cat food on Amazon

small mallory photo

About Mallory Crusta

Mallory is the Head of Content at All About Cats. Having produced and managed multimedia content across several pet-related domains, Mallory is dedicated to ensuring that the information on All About Cats is accurate, clear, and engaging. When she’s not reviewing pet products or editing content, Mallory enjoys skiing, hiking, and trying out new recipes in the kitchen. She has two cats, Wessie and Forest.

23 thoughts on “Stella & Chewy’s Cat Food Review

  1. bill

    You make it hard to compare their products. You list some by calories/oz, others calories/cup.
    Also, you liked the ingredient pumpkin seeds in two of the three, didn’t like it in the remaining flavor.

    Reply
  2. bill

    Thanks Mallory! Stella & Chewy seem to have a conflict of their own.
    Their support person didn’t seem to understand the issue I tried to relay.
    The medallions recommendation for a 14 lb cat was 7.5 (23 cal) medallions totaling 173 calories which matches most sites range for an adult cat. However their morsel products recommend 1.25 cups totaling 528 calories. (423 per cup) That makes no sense, and one fat cat.

    Thanks again,
    Bill-

    Reply
    1. small mallory photoMallory Crusta Post author

      Odd, indeed. I’m not too surprised—in my experience, Stella & Chewy’s doesn’t have the strongest customer support chops. At the end of the day, the per-ounce values are what matter, and you can use a scale to eliminate issues coming from variations in volume. Thanks again for pointing out this issue. It was an easy enough fix and makes the article a lot more useful/credible.

      Have a good one!

      Reply
  3. Seth

    Hi, what do you think of the Freeze Dried Raw coated kibble options from them? Are they a decent buy?

    Reply
    1. small mallory photoMallory Crusta Post author

      Hi Seth, that’s a great question! Their raw-coated kibble is okay. The carbohydrates are still high, but you’re getting nice meat-heavy nutrition with a boost from the raw coating. That said, I wouldn’t really recommend it unless your cat absolutely refuses to eat anything but kibble. I’d rather see someone feeding 50:50 raw and kibble, though—at least they’d be giving their cat a moisture boost that way.

      Reply
  4. Seth

    Thanks for your reply. My cat is currently eating a mix of Sheba perfect portions wet food and blue wilderness chicken crunchy food. I’m looking for a healthier crunchy food, if I’m understanding correctly the blue wilderness stuff isn’t bad but it’s not particularly great either. I looked at every pet store near me trying to find Dr Elseys Clean Protein and none of them carried it. Might have to order online.

    He is VERY picky, I’ve been trying to get him on 100% wet food but he just can’t shake the kibble. He doesn’t like any change in his diet, I’ve tried multiple high quality wet foods and he won’t eat anything besides the Sheba.

    Reply
  5. o

    Hi, I am trying to incorporate freeze-dried raw into my underweight, 13-year old kitty’s diet, and she loves both Stella and Chewy’s and Primal and they’ve helped her reach a healthier weight. Anyway in deciding which to settle her in to, i wanted to take phosphorous into account as a old-cat precaution, and came here because you guys do such thorough reviews. it confused me though, as to which has less…am i just missing something? Perhaps i am just not understanding the following text excerpted from the 2 reviews (and of course it’s hard to find this info on Stella’s!, in search of clarity!). thanks!

    primal:
    Primal products tend to be relatively high in phosphorus, with typical phosphorus content around 1.0% or roughly 2 grams per 1,000 calories. That’s close to the recommended amount for growing kittens and certainly too high for a cat with kidney disease.

    stella:
    The company claims that all of their freeze-dried and frozen foods have the same phosphorus content. That’s 0.45% to 0.67% on an as-fed basis. Tummy Ticklin’ Turkey frozen raw food, for example, is 0.61% phosphorus on an as-fed basis. This translates to roughly 3.9g per 1000 calories. That’s twice the AAFCO’s recommended amount for growing kittens.

    Reply
    1. small mallory photoMallory Crusta Post author

      The percentage looks higher on Primal food due to the fact that it’s measured on a dry matter basis, not “as-fed”, but Stella & Chewy’s food definitely seems to be higher in phosphorus. The grams per 1,000 calories value is more reliable than the percentage.

      Reply
  6. Doug

    You can look up the safety report on the Stella and Chewy website by entering your food’s product lot number? But where is the lot number printed on the packaging? I couldn’t find it by examining the bag of food, and couldn’t find anything on the Stella and Chewy website that indicated how to find it. I’m looking at the Stella and Chewy Raw Blend for cats. No dice.

    Reply
    1. Avatar photoKate Barrington

      Good question, Doug! The lot number is simply a string of numbers and/or letters, so it can be tough to find. It’s typically found on the side or bottom of the package, often near the “best before” date. If you can find the date, the lot number should be the combination of numbers/letters printed nearby.

      Reply
    2. Z

      A 10 lb cat is a small female, and that’s $2.53 a day to feed?
      Let’s say you have a 20 lb male. That’s $5.06 a day.
      5.06 x 365 days x 20 years = $36,938
      Got 2 males or 1 male and 2 females? $73,876
      Got 2 males and 2 females? $110,814

      That’s not including vet bills, litter, etc.

      Reply
  7. Davis

    Would you be able to review some of their canned wet food? Im thinking about feeding my cat the chicken and chicken liver pate and want to know you thoughts on it. Thank you!

    Reply
  8. Dea Longo

    As Bill had pointed out, the dry-freeze dinner morsels are much higher in calories than what the label states. 1kg has 4,440 kcal and the label states that 1 cup has 188 kcal, but this is incorrect, as a cup has about 120 grams or .12 kg. which has 533 kcal. Their label states that 3/4 cup should be fed to a 8 lb cat, which would be an insane amount of calories. Some of their packages expresses the calories per oz instead, in which case the morsels have 125 kcal per oz and given that 3/4 cup has about 3 oz of dry food, you’d be giving your cat roughly double the amount of calories per day.

    Reply
    1. small mallory photoMallory Crusta Post author

      Hello Chris, all of the Stella & Chewy’s foods listed here are formulated for all life stages, making them appropriate for both kittens and adult cats.

      Reply
  9. Ellen

    Hi! Thank you for your review. My cats are picky eaters, so they will only eat kibble. I found Stella and Chewy’s coated kibble, and I want to try it out because my cats are eating Chicken Soup for the Soul and don’t seem very energetic, and are always in grumpy moods since switching to that brand. Do you think it would be worth the switch?

    Reply
  10. Janet

    I have always been confused about the kcals of the dinner morsels. I don’t give them to my cat every day, but when I do, it is 6-7 morsels, rehydrated for a main meal. I switch to these instead of some of his other wet food, that is lots of moisture, but not kcals. I like to keep variety in his diet. How do I figure the kcals of the morsels? Put them in a dry measuring cup before reconstituting them or a liquid measuring cup before adding water

    Reply
    1. small mallory photoMallory Crusta Post author

      You can use any sort of measuring cup you like, and the calorie content seems to be based on the volume of the dry food, not rehydrated with water. Hope this helps.

      Reply
  11. Zoe Z

    Hi,
    Thank you so much for the analysis and review. I am wondering whether you folks can review some of their dry kibbles. My cats enjoyed their freeze-dried coated kibbles and seemed to have a very reasonable price compared to other kibbles.
    Best

    Reply
    1. small mallory photoMallory Crusta Post author

      Very good idea. We’ll consider it! There are a lot of interesting raw kibble products out there that we haven’t covered yet, so I agree that it would be a good option to review.

      Reply

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