9 Unmistakable Signs Your Cat Loves You

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While you may know that cats can experience feelings of love and attachment to humans and other animals, you may not recognize some of the signs your cat uses to express affection.

How to Tell if Your Cat Loves You

Here are the top 7 signs that your cat really digs you:

#1 Your Cat Brings you ‘Presents’

If you have a cat that likes to hunt and brings you part of what they have hunted then that is a fool proof sign that your cat is thinking of you and wants to shower you with presents. While it may be unnerving to find a half eaten lizard, mouse, or other small creature laying on your doorstep or pillow, rest assured that all it means is that your cat loves you.

#2 Your Cat Hangs out With You

As we all know, cats are not people pleasers. Unlike dogs, their whole world does not revolve around their human, and they are just fine hanging out by themselves.

When you enter a room or other space where your cat is, and they stop what they are doing and come running to you and purr and rub on your legs, or if your cat loves sitting on your lap and cuddly, that is a serious sign that your cat loves to be with you.

#3 Relaxed Direct Eye Contact

Cats communicate a lot with their eyes. A scared cat may look away from you, and a fractious, angry cat may try to intimidate you with growling and direct, wide open eye contact. In contrast, when a cat is happy, relaxed, and with someone they love, they will maintain long eye contact with slow blinks.

#4 Head Bunting

Cats rub their tails and faces on people they like. The reason they do this is because cats have scent glands located at the base of their tails and on their chins, and when they rub their face or tail on things, it deposits pheromones that send the message that ‘this human/other cat/dog/wall/plant/cat tree/toy is MINE and I love it.

#5 Tail Signs

Cats speak volumes through body language, and one of the body parts they use to ‘talk’ is their tail. If you notice that your cat gently flicks the top of their tail back and forth or wraps their tail around you when you are together, that is a sign of affection and connection.

#6 Showing Their Belly

Cats don’t typically show their belly unless they are feeling relaxed and comfortable. If your cat lets you rub their belly, that is an even higher sign of trust and love!

#7 Making Biscuits

If you have ever watched kittens nursing, you will have seen them kneading their mom with their paws while nursing. As cats grow, they keep this behavior and use it to indicate bliss and joy. Making biscuits is usually accompanied by purring, and is a sure sign that your cat is in love.

There you have it – the top 7 signs that your cat loves you! You may have noticed that purring is absent from this list. While purring can certainly indicate feline happiness, it is important to know that a purring cat isn’t always a happy cat.

Cats also purr when they are sick and nervous. Cats purr at a frequency that ranges from 25-100Hz, which correlates with known healing frequencies that humans use in therapy.

While we don’t know for certain why they do this, one theory is that they are trying to make themselves feel better by using the healing frequency of a purr. If your cat is purring, be mindful of your cat’s health and any other body language they are using to understand the reason behind the purr.

#8 Facial Rubbing

Facial rubbing on your hand, head, or other parts of the human body conveys a relaxed affectionate cat. Head bunting also expresses trust, willingness to interact, and possession. When your cat rubs or bunts you with their face, they release pheromones through scent glands, marking you as part of their community and home.

#9 Feline Words Of Affection

Did you know that cats have one of the widest ‘vocabularies’ (various forms of vocalisation) of any carnivorous species? Researchers identified at least 19 different variations of the ‘miaow’ that differ in tone, volume, intonation, pitch, and the situation it is used in.

Also Read: 7 Common Cat Vocalizations And What They Mean

While we’re not sure exactly what our cats’ vocalizations mean, it appears that some of them indicate friendliness and comfort.

  • Generally, miaow sounds are used to communicate friendly interactions with other cats and humans.
  • The purr is predominantly used by kittens when suckling and in other situations between cats where positive social interaction is taking place.  In adult cats, purring can communicate both happiness or pain. If your cat is purring while you are stroking him or her, there is a high chance he is content.
  • The chirrup is a greeting sound used between friendly, acquainted cats when they meet each other after a period of absence. It’s also common when cat parents enter the home.

Talking to your cat in a soft and reassuring voice will relax and keep them at ease while daily observation and attentive listening will turn him or her into your best friend.

Frequently Asked Questions

Does my cat love me?

If you have a cat that likes to hunt and brings you part of what they have hunted then that is a fool proof sign that your cat is thinking of you and wants to shower you with presents.

How do i know my cat loves me?

When you enter a room or other space where your cat is, and they stop what they are doing and come running to you and purr and rub on your legs, or if your cat loves sitting on your lap and cuddly, that is a serious sign that your cat loves to be with you.

Do cats feel loved?

Recent research on feline recognition of emotion has found that cats can recognize human gestures and expressions, and they behave differently to these emotions.

Why does my cat love me so much?

The love and trust a pet bestows upon us is unconditional. Most cats ask little in return. All we must do is provide food and shelter, take care of them, and enrich their environment to make all their natural desires come true.

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About Dr. Sarah Wooten, DVM, CVJ

A 2002 graduate of UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine, Dr. Sarah Wooten is a well known international speaker in the veterinary and animal health care spaces. She has 10 years experience in public speaking and media work, and writes for a large number of online and print animal health publications. Dr. Wooten is also a certified veterinary journalist, a member of the AVMA, and has 16 years experience in small animal veterinary practice. To learn more, visit drsarahwooten.com.

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