Deworming  

Jade Hall
Originally Answered: Deworming

Hello, so earlier this morning my 3 month old kitten had his first wellness exam, me and my significant other were worried that he may have worms since he hasn't been gaining much weight though he eats quite a bit as well as having a potbelly. The vet said he didn't have worms but recommended we still do the deworming treatment. so we did and now later at night he started throwing up, it's only been two times as of now but is it something I should be concerned about? I did a bit of research but some articles say it's a normal side effect while others say it's not


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Dr. Joanna Woodnutt, MRCVS
Originally Answered: Deworming

Hi Jade,

Vomiting after worming isn't 'normal', but it's not an uncommon side effect. Make sure your kitten drinks plenty of water and offer small amounts of food until his stomach has settled. Since kittens are prone to dehydration and don't have much 'reserve' when they're ill, you should call the vets if he becomes lethargic, the vomiting occurs more than six times in a 24 hour period, or if he won't eat or drink.

As long as the vomit occurs at least 2 hours after the medication was given, the chances are good that the medication was absorbed, and you don't have to give another wormer.

Next time he's due a wormer, don't forget to tell the vet he vomited last time - they might suggest a different product to reduce the chance of him reacting.

Good luck!


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caarr
caarr
Originally Answered: Deworming

Hi, ive got an adopted cat, shes 5 years and never been dewormed, i recently

found that her white blood cell count is low, is it still possible to deworm her? Thank you so much!


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Mallory Crusta
Originally Answered: Deworming

Hi there! Apologies for failing to see this post earlier. I don't have an answer to your question, but I'll send an email to Dr. Woodnutt and ask her if she's able to help you out.


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caarr
caarr
Originally Answered: Deworming

@mcrustawildernesscat-com  I also want to spay her, but her low wbc is stopping me to do these procedures.

I really just want her to have a better life 🙁 Thank you so much!!!


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Dr. Joanna Woodnutt, MRCVS
Originally Answered: Deworming

Hi @caarr,

I think the important thing to work out is how low your cat's cell count is, and why. A low cell count can be due to many things, including diseases such as feline parvo, feline AIDs (FELV), pancytopenia (which may be related to diet, if you're in the UK - check the recalls), and cancer. It would be unusual for a young cat's cell count to go low permanently, so I would definitely look at repeating the test and doing further investigations if it's still abnormal. 

Whilst there's no specific reason not to give a wormer with a low cell count, it would definitely depend on the individual cat - how ill they are, how low the count is, and why it's low. You wouldn't necessarily worm a cat fighting feline parvo, and the current outbreak of feline pancytopenia in the UK has a massively high mortality so there would be no point in worming an affected cat. However, FELV cats can definitely be wormed and spayed! Therefore, I'd definitely check with the vet who diagnosed the low WBC count about why it's low, and for advice on both worming and spaying her. 

I'm sorry I can't give you specific advice but this is one of those cases where the hands-on vet will have much more information about whether her count is serious, and some ideas as to why it might be.

Dr Woodnutt


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caarrbear
Originally Answered: Deworming

@joanna-woodnutt my cat tested negative for FIV, FELV feline parvo and the vet who checked on her said it could be due to stress since she was under so much stress before i adopted her. I really appreciate your reply, you guys are very helpful. Thank you so much!~


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