The Best Rabbit Cat Food

Share Email Pinterest Linkedin Twitter Facebook

Our Review Process

Our reviews are based on extensive research and, when possible, hands-on testing. Each time you make a purchase through one of our independently-chosen links, we’ll receive a percentage of the proceeds. Read more about how we’re supported here.

It’s not difficult to picture a wild cat chasing a rabbit across the plains, but is rabbit an appropriate choice for domestic cats?

In this guide, we’ll answer the question “is rabbit good for cats?” and discuss the situations in which you might consider feeding your cat a rabbit-based diet. We’ll also explore our top picks for the best rabbit cat food on the market.

At A Glance: Best Cat Food With Rabbit To Buy

Clock
500
hours of
research
Eye
25
brands
vetted
Check
8
features
reviewed
Star
8
top
picks

Want a quick look at the best cat foods reviewed in this article? In the comparison table below, we’ve highlighted some of the most important features of each product. You’ll find more detailed information about each product later in the article.

Best Overall
10.0
Picked by 31 people today!

Vital Essentials Rabbit Mini Nibs Freeze-Dried Cat Food

  • High-quality rabbit as a single source of animal protein
  • Doesn’t contain any added plant ingredients
  • Rich in skin and coat supporting omega-3 fatty acids
Premium Pick
9.8
Picked by 31 people today!

Koha Limited Ingredient Diet Rabbit Au Jus for Cats

  • Made with a single source of novel animal protein
  • Rich in moisture to support your cat’s hydration
  • Easily digestible, only a few main ingredients
Best Dry Food
9.5
Picked by 25 people today!

Instinct Limited Ingredient Diet Grain-Free Recipe with Real Rabbit Freeze-Dried Raw Coated Cat Food

  • Concentrated source of animal protein as the first ingredient
  • Limited list of ingredients with a single protein source
  • Free from artificial colors, flavors, and preservatives
Best Wet Food
9.4
Picked by 21 people today!

Ziwi Peak Rabbit & Lamb Recipe Canned Cat Food

  • Nine of the top ten ingredients (minus water) are animal based
  • Comprised primarily of muscle meat, organ meat, and bone
  • Rich in moisture to support your cat’s hydration
Best Freeze-Dried Food
9.3
Picked by 18 people today!

Primal Nuggets Rabbit Formula Nuggets Grain-Free Raw Freeze-Dried Cat Food

  • Rich in rabbit, rabbit bone, and rabbit organs
  • Made with a single source of high-quality animal protein
  • Two sources of added animal-based fat
Best High Protein
9.2
Picked by 18 people today!

Stella & Chewy’s Absolutely Rabbit Dinner Morsels

  • Top two are species-appropriate animal ingredients
  • Muscle meat, ground bone, and organ meat provides balanced nutrition
  • Supplemented with probiotics to support digestive health
Best Fresh Food
9.1
Picked by 18 people today!

Smallbatch Pets Rabbit Blend Raw Frozen Cat Food

  • Made with 97% rabbit (including bone)
  • Raw frozen to preserve nutritional integrity
  • Finely ground for palatability and easy chewing
Best Food Topper
9.0
Picked by 18 people today!

Merrick Backcountry Grain-Free Morsels in Gravy Real Rabbit Recipe

  • Rich in species-appropriate animal protein
  • Packed with hydration-supporting moisture
  • Adds protein, moisture, and flavor to your cat’s diet

Why You Should Trust Us?

Over the last several years, we’ve spent countless hours testing the most popular pet products on the market, including cat food, cat treats, cat litter, and more. We’ve written in-depth reviews of our favorite brands as well as dozens of roundups to help you choose the right product for your cat.

Having reviewed 147 of the world’s most popular cat food brands and hundreds of formulas. We spent hours researching, contacting pet food companies, and analyzing labels. With the help of our cats, we also got hands-on experience with a few foods.

In addition to general research on cat food, I have personal experience feeding my cats a single-protein rabbit diet. One of my cats, Biscuit, is allergic to chicken and unknown other proteins. Rabbit has been the best for her, and my two other cats seem to enjoy it as well.

Is Rabbit Good For Cats?

The most important thing any cat owner needs to know about their feline friend is that he is an obligate carnivore. This simply means that his body is designed to eat meat.

As long as your cat’s diet is packed with animal protein, you’re pretty much free to choose any recipe you like. It’s worth considering, however, the type of protein you choose for your cat. Some are more species-appropriate than others and cats with allergies may not be able to tolerate certain ones.

Rabbit is an excellent protein choice for cats because it’s component of a natural feline diet.

That being said, rabbits do not make up the majority of the diet for most wild cats. It’s a healthy and biologically appropriate option, but not necessarily than other proteins.

Rabbit meat is fairly low in calories because the meat is very lean. Compared to fattier proteins like beef and fish – 250 kcal and 142 kcal per 100g serving, respectively – rabbit contains just 96 calories per 3-ounce serving (about 84g).

A serving this size contains about 18 grams of protein and just 2 grams of fat. Rabbit also contains significant amounts of phosphorus, selenium, zinc, niacin, and vitamin B with particularly high levels of vitamin B12.

Why Feed Your Cat Food Made With Rabbit?

Before shopping for cat food made with rabbit, think about your motivation for doing so. Rabbit is an excellent source of animal protein and one likely to be included in a wild cat’s diet. Because rabbit-based diets tend to be expensive, however, it may not be the best option for all cats.

There are two optimal reasons to switch your cat to a single-protein diet made with rabbit.

First, you’re trying to provide your cat with a more species-appropriate diet and one closer to the diet followed by his wild ancestors. This wild diet would have consisted primarily of birds and small mammals, inclusive of the muscle meat, organ meat, and bone.

If this is your motivation, the best rabbit-based diet to choose is a raw, homemade, or freeze-dried diet made exclusively with rabbit meat, organs, and bone. It shouldn’t contain any added carbohydrate and should be made with minimal use of synthetic supplements.

For cats who aren’t allergic to common proteins, a rabbit-based recipe that incorporates other high-quality animal proteins could also be appropriate.

The second reason to feed your cat a rabbit diet is if he’s allergic to more common proteins like chicken, beef, and fish.

A significant number of cat foods on the market are made with chicken as the primary protein because it is affordable and readily available. Other proteins like fish, beef, and pork are also easy to find but may cost a little more in some cases. Unfortunately, cats can develop allergies at any time to ingredients that are present in their diet.

If you’ve run out of options with common proteins, you may need to switch to something a little different. Find a novel protein (one your cat hasn’t eaten before). In some cases, this might be a less common cat food ingredient like rabbit.

When shopping for rabbit cat food, be sure to follow the tenets of choosing a healthy diet for your cat.

It should be primarily animal based with the lowest carbohydrate content possible (ideally none). Avoid recipes that include vaguely named animal ingredients or by-products, plant protein concentrates, low-value grains, and artificial additives.

The Best Rabbit Cat Foods: Our Top Picks

Now that you understand the basics of rabbit food for cats and some of the cases in which it might be recommended, you’re ready to see our top picks. Check them out below.

#1 Best Overall: Vital Essentials

Buy On Chewy Buy On Amazon

Read Our Full Brand Review

Vital Essentials offers a variety of freeze-dried and frozen food for cats and dogs. The brand is owned by the Carnivore Meat Company, the leading private label raw pet food company in the U.S. Vital Essentials uses all pasture-fed, farm-raised, free-run, and wild-caught animal proteins in their recipes and all ingredients are frozen or freeze-dried in the company’s own kitchens – they’re never exposed to heat.

We’ve given Vital Essentials a 47 out of 60 rating or a B+ grade.

Featured Recipe: Vital Essentials Rabbit Mini Nibs Freeze-Dried Cat Food

First 5 Ingredients: Rabbit, Rabbit Liver, Rabbit Heart, Rabbit Kidney, Rabbit Lung

This freeze-dried formula from Vital Essentials is a high-protein recipe featuring rabbit as the only source of animal protein. In addition to fresh rabbit as the first ingredient, it contains four rabbit-derived organ meats including liver, heart, kidney, and lung.

Herring oil is the only added fat in this formula and a rich animal-based source of omega-3 fatty acids. In addition to supporting skin and coat health, omega-3s promote cognitive function, joint health, and cardiovascular health.

This recipe is made with a limited list of ingredients which makes it a great option for cats with sensitive stomach – especially those allergic to other common proteins. Some cats may not like the freeze-dried texture, but it’s designed to be rehydrated before feeding. This helps provide your cat with essential moisture to support optimal hydration.

Ingredients

Rabbit, Rabbit Liver, Rabbit Heart, Rabbit Kidney, Rabbit Lung, Herring Oil, Mixed Tocopherols (Preservative), Vitamin E Supplement, Zinc Amino Acid Complex, Iron Amino Acid Complex, Copper Amino Acid Complex, Manganese Amino Acid Complex.

Guaranteed Analysis

loader
Crude Protein: 60%
Crude Fat: 17%
Crude Fiber: 3%
Moisture: 8%

Dry Matter Basis

loader
Protein: 65.22%
Fat: 18.48%
Fiber: 3.26%
Carbs: 13.04%

Caloric Weight Basis

loader
Protein: 52.96%
Fat: 36.44%
Carbs: 10.59%

What We Liked

  • High-quality rabbit as a single source of animal protein
  • Doesn’t contain any added plant ingredients
  • Rich in skin and coat supporting omega-3 fatty acids

What We Didn’t Like

  • Needs to be rehydrated before feeding
  • Fairly expensive

#2 Premium Pick: Koha

Buy On Koha

Read Our Full Brand Review

Koha was founded by Lonnie and Jennifer Schwimmer in 2014 as a wet food-only company. All of their products contain 70% to 90% animal protein and high levels of moisture to support your cat’s hydration. Many of their recipes are made with a single protein source and limited ingredient list, making the brand an excellent choice for picky eaters and cats with food allergies. All products are formulated an animal nutritionist and the brand has never had a recall.

We’ve given Koha a 51 out of 60 rating or an A grade.

Featured Recipe: Koha Limited Ingredient Diet Rabbit Au Jus for Cats

First 5 Ingredients: Rabbit, Water, Ground Flaxseed, New Zealand Green Mussel, Agar Agar

If your cat doesn’t enjoy the texture of rehydrated freeze-dried food, a wet food formula like this Koha rabbit recipe might do the trick. It’s packed with animal protein and contains plenty of moisture to support your cat’s hydration. It’s also much lower in carbs than the average dry food.

This recipe starts off strong with fresh rabbit as the main ingredient and only includes four other main ingredients (excluding water). Ground flaxseed is a plant-based source of omega-3 fatty acids while agar agar serves as a thickener and pumpkin as a source of fiber.

New Zealand green mussels are a supplementary source of protein but, more importantly, a natural source of glucosamine, chondroitin, and other essential nutrients. Both glucosamine and chondroitin support joint health in cats.

Overall, there’s not much to complain about with this recipe. It does contain a few plant ingredients and it’s pretty pricey, but customers (and their cats) really seem to like it. With over 330 reviews on Koha’s website, this recipe carries a 4.7 out of 5-star rating.

Ingredients

Rabbit, Water Sufficient For Processing, Ground Flaxseed, New Zealand Green Mussel, Agar Agar, Pumpkin, Potassium Chloride, Choline Chloride, Salt, Taurine, Dried Kale, Cranberries, Ginger, Turmeric, Iron Proteinate, Zinc Proteinate, Vitamin E Supplement, Thiamine Mononitrate, Copper Proteinate, Manganese Proteinate, Sodium Selenite, Niacin Supplement, D-Calcium Pantothenate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Riboflavin Supplement, Vitamin A Supplement, Biotin, Potassium Iodide, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Folic Acid.

Guaranteed Analysis

loader
Crude Protein: 9%
Crude Fat: 4%
Crude Fiber: 1%
Moisture: 82%

Dry Matter Basis

loader
Protein: 50%
Fat: 22.22%
Fiber: 5.56%
Carbs: 22.22%

Caloric Weight Basis

loader
Protein: 39.62%
Fat: 42.77%
Carbs: 17.61%

Ingredients We Liked: Rabbit, New Zealand Green Mussel

Ingredients We Didn’t Like: Ground Flaxseed

Common Allergens: None

What We Liked

  • Made with a single source of novel animal protein
  • Rich in moisture to support your cat’s hydration
  • Easily digestible, only a few main ingredients

What We Didn’t Like

  • Contains some unnecessary plant ingredients
  • Very expensive, over $0.60 per ounce

#3 Best Dry Cat Food: Instinct

Buy On Chewy Buy On Amazon

Read Our Full Brand Review

Formerly Nature’s Variety Instinct, Instinct started off as a small pet food manufacturer based in Lincoln, Nebraska. It is now owned by Agrolimen, one of the largest European pet food suppliers. Instinct is dedicated to producing meat-centric recipes for dogs and cats including a wide variety of dry foods, wet foods, treats, and meal toppers.

We’ve given Instinct a 44 out of 60 rating or a B grade.

Featured Recipe: Instinct Limited Ingredient Diet Grain-Free Recipe with Real Rabbit Freeze-Dried Raw Coated Cat Food

First 5 Ingredients: Rabbit Meal, Peas, Tapioca, Canola Oil, Rabbit

If your cat prefers kibble, this rabbit dry cat food could be a good choice. It’s shaped in small, bite-sized kibbles packed with rabbit protein and flavor. Even better, the kibbles are coated with freeze-dried rabbit for a boost of irresistible aroma and rabbit flavor.

Formulated for all life stages, this dry food starts with rabbit meal as a concentrated source of animal protein. It’s the only protein in the recipe and, unfortunately, it is followed by three plant ingredients including starchy peas and tapioca.

While this formula is much higher in carbohydrates than we like to see, it’s on par with the average dry food. It’s nutritionally balanced through the use of synthetic vitamin and mineral supplements and is completely free from artificial colors, flavors, and preservatives.

Ingredients

Rabbit Meal, Peas, Tapioca, Canola Oil (preserved with Mixed Tocopherols and Citric Acid), Rabbit, Natural Flavor, Coconut Oil, Montmorillonite Clay, Taurine, Choline Chloride, Potassium Chloride, Vitamins (Vitamin E Supplement, L-Ascorbyl-2-Polyphosphate, Niacin Supplement, Thiamine Mononitrate, d-Calcium Pantothenate, Vitamin A Supplement, Riboflavin Supplement, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Folic Acid, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Biotin), DL-Methionine, Minerals (Zinc Proteinate, Iron Proteinate, Copper Proteinate, Manganese Proteinate, Sodium Selenite, Ethylenediamine Dihydriodide), Freeze Dried Rabbit, Salt, Pumpkinseeds, Rosemary Extract.

Guaranteed Analysis

loader
Crude Protein: 35%
Crude Fat: 19%
Crude Fiber: 5.5%
Moisture: 9%

Dry Matter Basis

loader
Protein: 38.46%
Fat: 20.88%
Fiber: 6.04%
Carbs: 34.62%

Caloric Weight Basis

loader
Protein: 31.07%
Fat: 40.96%
Carbs: 27.96%

What We Liked

  • Concentrated source of animal protein as the first ingredient
  • Limited list of ingredients with a single protein source
  • Free from artificial colors, flavors, and preservatives

What We Didn’t Like

  • No dry food provides the moisture your cat needs
  • Contains several unnecessary plant ingredients

#4 Best Wet Cat Food: Ziwi Peak

Buy On Chewy Buy On Amazon

Read Our Full Brand Review

Ziwi Peak was founded in 2004 by Kimberly and Peter Mitchell. Previous to developing his own brand, Peter works in the meat business selling commoditized ingredients. This experience brought Kimberly and Peter to the realization that there was a growing demand for all-meat pet food. They began working with slaughterhouses to source surplus meat and designed their own air-drying system to transport it safely. Today, Ziwi Peak offers a variety of air-dried and wet cat foods.

We’ve given Ziwi Peak a 48 out of 60 rating or an A- grade.

Featured Recipe: Ziwi Peak Rabbit & Lamb Recipe Canned Cat Food

First 5 Ingredients: Rabbit Meat, Water Sufficient for Processing, Lamb, Lamb Lung, Lamb Liver

Wet cat food is often preferable to dry food for your feline friend because it tends to be higher in protein and much higher in moisture. Moist foods don’t require as much carbohydrate during processing and the moisture content is naturally higher which helps support your cat’s hydration.

This particular recipe is one of Ziwi Peak’s few formulas that incorporates multiple animal proteins. Though marketed as a rabbit pate, it also contains lam meat and lamb organs. While it may not be appropriate for cats with lamb allergies, it might work out perfectly for cats who are allergic to more common proteins like chicken and beef.

Nine of the ten eleven ingredients (excluding water) are animal-based. Fresh rabbit meat tops the list with fresh lamb, six lamb organs, lamb bone, and New Zealand green mussels to follow. The only source of added carbohydrate is chickpeas, an ingredient we don’t love, but the total carb content is still very low – estimated under 5% as fed.

Ingredients

Rabbit Meat, Water Sufficient for Processing, Lamb, Lamb Lung, Lamb Liver, Chickpeas, Lamb Kidney, Hare Meat, Lamb Tripe, Lamb Heart, New Zealand Green Mussel, Lamb Bone, DL-Methionine, Dried Kelp, Minerals (Magnesium Sulfate, Zinc Amino Acid Complex, Manganese Amino Acid Complex, Copper Amino Acid Complex), Taurine, Vitamins (Vitamin E Supplement, Thiamine Mononitrate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Folic Acid).

Guaranteed Analysis

loader
Crude Protein: 11%
Crude Fat: 3.5%
Crude Fiber: 2%
Moisture: 78%
Ash: 4%

Dry Matter Basis

loader
Protein: 50%
Fat: 15.91%
Fiber: 9.09%
Carbs: 6.82%

Caloric Weight Basis

loader
Protein: 52.38%
Fat: 40.48%
Carbs: 7.14%

What We Liked

  • Nine of the top ten ingredients (minus water) are animal based
  • Comprised primarily of muscle meat, organ meat, and bone
  • Rich in moisture to support your cat’s hydration

What We Didn’t Like

  • Not a single source protein recipe
  • Fairly expensive

#5 Best Freeze-Dried Food: Primal

Buy On Chewy Buy On Amazon

Read Our Full Brand Review

The story of Primal starts with Matt Koss in 2000 when his dog, Luna, was diagnosed with early stage renal failure. Having tried various treatments including veterinary diets, Koss decided to make Luna’s dog food himself using raw meat and bones. He eventually expanded his operation and founded Primal Pet Food in 2001. All recipes are formulated to mimic a whole prey diet.

We’ve given Primal a 43 out of 60 rating or a B grade.

Featured Recipe: Primal Nuggets Rabbit Formula Nuggets Grain-Free Raw Freeze-Dried Cat Food

First 5 Ingredients: Rabbit (with ground bone), Rabbit Livers, Organic Kale, Organic Celery, Organic Pumpkin Seeds

Meat is the first ingredient in every Primal pet food recipe. Many formulas are made with single proteins to address food sensitivities, and they’ll all free from fillers, by-products, and artificial additives.

This rabbit recipe freeze-dried cat food starts with rabbit (including ground bone) as the first ingredient, followed by nutritious rabbit livers. You’ll find rabbit kidneys and lungs further down the list as well as fish oil and cod liver oil as added sources of animal-based fat.

Though rich in protein, this recipe contains a significant number of plant ingredients, but the estimated carb content is still around 10% as fed. The quality of the ingredients in this formula is very high, so the two biggest issues are the high price tag and the texture. The food is designed to be rehydrated before feeding but some cats simply don’t like it.

Ingredients

Rabbit (with ground bone), Rabbit Livers, Organic Kale, Organic Celery, Organic Pumpkin Seeds, Organic Sunflower Seeds, Organic Cranberries, Organic Blueberries, Rabbit Kidneys, Organic Squash, Rabbit Lungs, Rabbit Hearts, Organic Cilantro, Organic Ginger, Organic Quinoa, Organic Apple Cider Vinegar, Fish Oil, Montmorillonite Clay, Organic Rosemary Extract, Taurine, Organic Coconut Oil, Cod Liver Oil, Vitamin E Supplement, Organic Ground Alfalfa, Dried Organic Kelp.

Guaranteed Analysis

loader
Crude Protein: 57%
Crude Fat: 19%
Crude Fiber: 3%
Moisture: 10%

Dry Matter Basis

loader
Protein: 63.33%
Fat: 21.11%
Fiber: 3.33%
Carbs: 12.22%

Caloric Weight Basis

loader
Protein: 49.94%
Fat: 40.43%
Carbs: 9.64%

What We Liked

  • Rich in rabbit, rabbit bone, and rabbit organs
  • Made with a single source of high-quality animal protein
  • Two sources of added animal-based fat
  • Free from fillers, by-products, and artificial additives

What We Didn’t Like

  • Some cats dislike the texture of rehydrated food
  • Contains a significant number of plant ingredients
  • Very expensive

#6 Best High Protein: Stella & Chewy’s

Buy On Chewy Buy On Amazon

Read Our Full Brand Review

Stella & Chewy’s was founded in 2003 when founder Marie Moody adopted a dog named Chewy. When her new canine friend was diagnosed with distemper, Moody began feeding both Chewy and her other dog Stella a raw diet. Eventually Moody began delivering homemade raw food throughout New York City, an enterprise which blossomed into Stella & Chewy’s one of the best-known raw pet food brands in the pet industry.

We’ve given Stella & Chewy’s a 39 out of 60 rating or a B- grade.

Featured Recipe: Stella & Chewy’s Absolutely Rabbit Dinner Morsels

First 5 Ingredients: Rabbit With Ground Bone, Rabbit Liver, Olive Oil, Pumpkin Seed, Potassium Chloride

Stella & Chewy’s freeze-dried pet foods come in several forms including morsels, dinner patties, meal mixers and more. The brand offers a variety of single-protein formulas including this freeze-dried rabbit recipe.

This protein-packed recipe starts with two rabbit-based ingredients: rabbit with ground bone and rabbit liver. Rabbit, of course, is fresh rabbit meat that provides a rich source of animal-based protein. Rabbit liver adds protein as well but both this ingredient and the ground bone are packed with essential vitamins and minerals to support optimal nutrition.

Though this product does contain a few unnecessary plant ingredients, it’s still much lower in carbohydrates than the average dry food (estimated under 20% as fed). On a dry matter basis, it contains over 63% protein.

This formula is sold in bags up to 18 ounces. It’s very expensive but because the product is designed to be rehydrated before feeding, that 18-ounce bag will go a fairly long way.

Ingredients

Rabbit With Ground Bone, Rabbit Liver, Olive Oil, Pumpkin Seed, Potassium Chloride, Sodium Phosphate, Choline Chloride, Dried Ediococcus Acidilactici Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus Acidophilus Fermentation Product, Dried Bifidobacterium Longum Fermentation Product, Dried Bacillus Coagulans Fermentation Product, Taurine, Tocopherols (Preservative), Dandelion, Dried Kelp, Zinc Proteinate, Iron Proteinate, Vitamin A Supplement, Vitamin E Supplement, Niacin Supplement, Copper Proteinate, Riboflavin Supplement, Sodium Selenite, D-Calcium Pantothenate, Biotin, Manganese Proteinate, Thiamine Mononitrate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Folic Acid, Vitamin B12 Supplement.

Guaranteed Analysis

loader
Crude Protein: 44%
Crude Fat: 30%
Crude Fiber: 5%
Moisture: 5%

Dry Matter Basis

loader
Protein: 46.32%
Fat: 31.58%
Fiber: 5.26%
Carbs: 16.84%

Caloric Weight Basis

loader
Protein: 33.12%
Fat: 54.84%
Carbs: 12.04%

What We Liked

  • Top two are species-appropriate animal ingredients
  • Muscle meat, ground bone, and organ meat provides balanced nutrition
  • Supplemented with probiotics to support digestive health

What We Didn’t Like

  • Very expensive
  • Needs to be rehydrated before feeding

#7 Best Fresh Food: Smallbatch Pets

Buy On SmallBatchPets.com

Read Our Full Brand Review

Based out of San Francisco, California, Smallbatch Pets is a small, family-owned pet food company. The idea for Smallbatch was formulated in 2003 and, by 2004, the brand had begun producing fresh pet food using humanely raised met and organic vegetables. Smallbatch began home delivery in 2005 and pened their first brick-and-mortar store in 2007. Since then, they’ve expanded to offer their products in local and independent pet stores around the country.

We’ve given Smallbatch a 44 out of 60 rating or a B grade.

Featured Recipe: Smallbatch Pets Rabbit Blend Raw Frozen Cat Food

First 5 Ingredients: Rabbit Including Bones, Rabbit Hearts, Rabbit Livers, Rabbit Kidneys, Salmon Oil

Experts agree that fresh cat food is one of the most nutritious options for your feline friend. Not only is it rich in moisture, but raw food in particular is incredibly species-appropriate. Smallbatch frozen cat food comes in a variety of single-protein formulas including these rabbit sliders.

This recipe consists of 97% humanely raised and harvested rabbit with 1% organic produce and 2% natural supplements. It’s not quite a limited ingredient cat food because it contains a fairly extensive list of organic veggies, but whole rabbit (including bone) is the first ingredient.

Smallbatch frozen rabbit cat food comes in the form of sliders and tubes. The sliders make portioning the food easy and the food itself is ground to 3/16th inch to give it a fine, palatable texture.

Ingredients

Rabbit Including Bones, Rabbit Hearts, Rabbit Livers, Rabbit Kidneys, Salmon Oil, Organic Dandelion Greens, Organic Apple Cider Vinegar, Organic Kelp*, Organic Bee Pollen, Organic Barley Grass, Organic Cranberries, Vitamin E Supplement

Guaranteed Analysis

loader
Crude Protein: 19.8%
Crude Fat: 6.7%
Crude Fiber: 0.2%
Moisture: 60%
Ash: 3.9%

Dry Matter Basis

loader
Protein: 49.5%
Fat: 16.75%
Fiber: 0.5%
Carbs: 23.5%

Caloric Weight Basis

loader
Protein: 43.54%
Fat: 35.78%
Carbs: 20.67%

What We Liked

  • Made with 97% rabbit (including bone)
  • Raw frozen to preserve nutritional integrity
  • Finely ground for palatability and easy chewing

What We Didn’t Like

  • Contains a significant number of plant ingredients
  • Very expensive

#8 Best Food Topper: Merrick

Buy On Chewy Buy On Amazon

Read Our Full Brand Review

If you’ve ever shopped for cat or dog food, you’re probably familiar with the name Merrick. Founded back in 1988, Merrick has been a major manufacturer of pet food. The brand was sold to Nestle Purina in 2015 and has continued to enjoy success throughout the country and the world. This brand aims to work with local growers and produces recipes that deliver “health you can see” through complete and balanced nutrition for cats.

We’ve given Merrick a 38 out of 60 rating or a C+ grade.

Featured Recipe: Merrick Backcountry Grain-Free Morsels in Gravy Real Rabbit Recipe

First 5 Ingredients: Deboned Rabbit, Lamb Broth, Beef Broth, Beef Liver, Deboned Lamb

Cats have a propensity for being picky eaters. When your cat turns up his nose at the same food he inhaled with gusto the day before, it can be frustrating. In many cases, however, the solution is simple: add a meaty and flavorful food topper.

This rabbit recipe meal topper from Merrick is packed with protein from deboned rabbit, beef liver, and deboned lamb. While it’s not a single protein formula, it’s a great option for cats with chicken or fish allergies. It’s also packed with moisture to support your cat’s hydration and digestive health.

In addition to being free from grains and gluten, this topper is fairly low in carbohydrates and completely free from artificial flavors, colors, and preservatives. It’s also nutritionally balanced for complete nutrition so you can use it as your cat’s staple diet, if you like.

Ingredients

Deboned Rabbit, Lamb Broth, Beef Broth, Beef Liver, Deboned Lamb, Dried Egg Whites, Potato Starch, Natural Flavor, Guar Gum, Sodium Phosphate, Salt, Potassium Chloride, Calcium Carbonate, Taurine, Salmon Oil (Preserved With Mixed Tocopherols) Choline Chloride, Minerals (Iron Amino Acid Chelate, Zinc Amino Acid Chelate, Copper Amino Acid Chelate, Manganese Amino Acid Chelate, Sodium Selenite, Potassium Iodide) Sodium Carbonate, Vitamins (Vitamin E Supplement, Thiamine Mononitrate, Niacin Supplement, d-Calcium Pantothenate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Riboflavin Supplement, Vitamin A Supplement, Biotin, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Folic Acid) Inulin, Rosemary, Sage, Thyme, Rosemary Extract.

Guaranteed Analysis

loader
Crude Protein: 9%
Crude Fat: 3%
Crude Fiber: 1.2%
Moisture: 81%
Ash: 2.3%

Dry Matter Basis

loader
Protein: 47.37%
Fat: 15.79%
Fiber: 6.32%
Carbs: 18.42%

Caloric Weight Basis

loader
Protein: 45.49%
Fat: 36.82%
Carbs: 17.69%

What We Liked

  • Rich in species-appropriate animal protein
  • Packed with hydration-supporting moisture
  • Adds protein, moisture, and flavor to your cat’s diet

What We Didn’t Like

  • Only two added plant ingredients (used for thickening)
  • Not a single-protein formula

Final Thoughts

Unless your cat is allergic to other common proteins, a rabbit-based diet may not be the most economical option for most cat owners. Novel proteins like these are expensive, especially if you’re looking for a single-protein formula.

If you suspect your cat has food allergies, you’ll need to do a feeding trial. Determine which proteins are included in your cat’s current diet and start feeding him a food made from another protein, ideally a hypoallergenic cat food made with single source of animal protein.

After 6 weeks or so, you should be able to tell whether your cat’s symptoms have abated. At this point, you can try adding back those proteins you eliminated one at a time and in small portions. If your cat’s symptoms return, you’ll have identified the culprit and can simply choose a new cat food that doesn’t contain that ingredient.

Learn more about allergies in cats in this in-depth article.

About Kate Barrington

Kate Barrington holds a Bachelor’s degree in English and is the published author of several self-help books and nutrition guides. Also an avid dog lover and adoring owner of three cats, Kate’s love for animals has led her to a successful career as a freelance writer specializing in pet care and nutrition. Kate is also a blogger for a number of organic and natural food companies as well as a columnist for several pet magazines.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.