The 6 Best Cat Food To Stop Vomiting

Medically reviewed by JoAnna Pendergrass, DVM
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Vomiting is a common problem in cats. Common as it is, it can make your cat feel unwell and often leaves cat parents like you with a stinky mess to clean up.

Vomiting in cats is generally classified as acute or chronic.

Acute vomiting, the most common form in cats, generally lasts one or two days. This form of vomiting is easy to treat, if treatment is needed at all. Chronic vomiting, on the other hand, is more serious, can go on for weeks, and may require veterinary treatment.

At A Glance: Best Cat Foods To Stop Vomiting

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Want a quick look at the products reviewed in this article? In the comparison table below, we’ve highlighted some of the most important features of each product. You’ll find more detailed information about each product later in the article.

Overall Best
9.9
Picked by 31 people today!

Smalls Fresh Ground Other Bird

  • Made with human-grade ingredients
  • Rich in real animal protein
  • High in moisture, low in carbohydrates
Runner Up
8.5
Picked by 25 people today!

Stella & Chewy’s Chick Chick Chicken Dinner Morsels Freeze-Dried Raw Cat Food

  • Contains fresh muscle meat, organs, and ground bone
  • Made with a single source of quality animal protein
  • Supplemented with probiotics for healthy digestion
Best Ethically-Sourced
8.3
Picked by 31 people today!

Open Farm Pasture-Raised Lamb Dry Food

  • Pasture-raised lamb as the primary ingredient
  • Herring oil provides a rich source of omega-3 fatty acids
  • Highly digestible, made with 100% human-grade ingredients
Best Wet Cat Food
8.0
Picked by 21 people today!

Wellness CORE Digestive Health Chicken Pate Recipe

  • Highly digestible for most cats
  • Top four ingredients are all animal-based
  • Supplemented with prebiotic fibers
Best Dry Cat Food
8.0
Picked by 18 people today!

Blue Buffalo Sensitive Stomach Chicken Recipe Adult Dry Cat Food

  • Made with high-quality, natural ingredients
  • Supplemented with prebiotics and probiotics
  • Nutritionally balanced and easy to digest
Best For Senior Cats
8.0
Picked by 18 people today!

Halo Holistic Chicken & Chicken Liver Recipe Grain-Free Senior Dry Cat Food Food

  • Formulated to support digestive health
  • Rich in omega-3 fatty acids
  • Highly digestible, no artificial additives

Before we get into the reviews of our top picks, let’s take a closer look at the issue of vomiting in cats.

Vomiting vs. Regurgitation

Vomiting refers to the evacuation of food from the stomach. It is not a disease or diagnosis on its own but can be a symptom of an underlying condition.

Occasional (acute) vomiting in cats is perfectly normal. If your cat is otherwise healthy, you shouldn’t panic if he vomits once a month or so, especially if the vomited material is mostly hair. Cats tend to swallow hair during grooming and will vomit hairballs from time to time.

However, if your cat vomits more than three times and develops other symptoms such as lethargy or difficulty keeping food down, contact your veterinarian. These symptoms indicate an underlying health problem that could require veterinary care.

The terms ‘vomiting’ and ‘regurgitation’ are sometimes used interchangeably, but they are not exactly the same thing. It’s good to know the difference between the two.

While vomiting is generally associated with issues of the stomach, regurgitation is a passive process related to the esophagus. Regurgitation occurs quickly without any abdominal contractions, usually right after eating or drinking.

If the vomited material looks like undigested food, it’s likely regurgitation and not vomiting.

What Causes Vomiting In Cats?

Pinpointing the cause of vomiting can be difficult. The causes of acute or chronic vomiting can be identical, though there are some exceptions.

Ingestion of foreign bodies or toxic substances is generally a cause of acute rather than chronic vomiting.

Generally speaking, the causes of vomiting in cats can be divided into four categories:

  1. Toxins
  2. Drugs
  3. Diet
  4. Disease

Toxins may include everything from household chemicals to poisonous plants. Drugs that may cause vomiting include chemotherapy treatments, antibiotics, and anti-inflammatories.

Diet is one of the most common causes of vomiting in cats. Many cats have sensitive stomachs, so an acute episode of vomiting could be linked to a sudden change in diet. If you’re going to change your cat’s diet, you should transition him slowly onto the new food to avoid this kind of digestive upset.

Vomiting can also be caused by eating spoiled food, garbage, or a dead animal. It may also be caused by a sensitivity or dietary intolerance to an ingredient in the food.

Here are some of the  ingredients most likely to trigger a dietary intolerance or sensitivity:

  • Food additives (colors and flavors)
  • Artificial preservatives
  • High levels of carbohydrate
  • Lactose (from milk)
  • Certain grains (wheat, barley, corn)
  • Common proteins (chicken, beef, pork, eggs)

If toxins, drugs, and diet don’t seem to be the issue, your cat may be suffering from an underlying disease or disorder that’s causing his vomiting.

Systemic diseases like hyperthyroidism and kidney disease have been known to cause vomiting. These conditions are fairly serious and generally require treatment. Intestinal parasites like roundworms can also disrupt your cat’s digestion and cause vomiting.

If you’re not immediately able to identify the cause of your cat’s vomiting, schedule an appointment with your veterinarian. Your vet can rule out underlying conditions and diagnose your cat’s health issues. Even if you know what’s causing your cat’s vomiting, it would still be a good idea to have your veterinarian examine your cat to assess your cat’s overall health.

Also Read: Best Cat Food for Hairball Control

How To Treat Vomiting In Cats?

In some cases, the best treatment for vomiting in cats is no treatment at all. This is generally the case with occasional vomiting and hairballs. If vomiting becomes a chronic issue, however, you’ll want to work with your veterinarian to identify the cause, then follow your vet’s treatment recommendations to treat the vomiting.

For occasional vomiting, your vet might recommend giving your cat a bland diet for a day or two until the vomiting subsides. Make sure water is freely available to prevent dehydration.
In cases of severe or chronic vomiting, your vet will probably prescribe medication to help control the problem.

To determine how best to treat your cat’s vomiting, consider the following:

  • Frequency of vomiting. If your cat vomits one to three times within a 24-hour period, it may be nothing to worry about (don’t hesitate to call your vet, though, to make sure that your cat’s okay). Vomiting that lasts more than 24 hours should be addressed by a veterinarian to identify the cause.
  • Energy and activity. If your cat is vomiting but otherwise acting normal, it may be nothing to worry about. If your cat becomes lethargic or experiences additional symptoms such as diarrhea, constipation, or excess vocalization, take him to the vet.
  • Appearance of blood. Vomiting blood is generally an indication of internal bleeding and should be treated as a medical emergency. The blood may look red or dark brown to black, depending on which part of the digestive tract the blood is coming from.

If you suspect your cat’s vomiting may be due to dietary intolerance or food sensitivity, the best thing you can do is make changes to your cat’s diet. Look for a cat food that is made with high-quality, natural ingredients and no artificial additives or ingredients that might upset your cat’s stomach. Talk to your veterinarian before making any changes to your cat’s diet.

What To Look For In Cat Food For Vomiting?

Unless you already know what ingredients your cat is reacting to, you may need to do an elimination diet. This involves feeding your cat a limited ingredient diet made with a novel source of protein (one your cat hasn’t eaten before) for 8 to 12 weeks until all signs of sensitivity resolve.

This is generally the best course of action to take if you suspect a food allergy to a specific ingredient. If you suspect the issue is more related to the quality of the food, an elimination diet may not be needed. Your vet will give you specific instructions on how to perform the elimination diet.

Here are some things to look for in a good cat food for vomiting:

  • Made with wholesome, natural ingredients
  • Real source of animal-based protein
  • Moderate healthy fat content (ideally animal-based)
  • Low carb content, easily digestible carbs
  • Free from by-products and low-quality fillers
  • No artificial additives like colors, flavors, or preservatives

Generally speaking, the shorter the ingredients list, the better. If a commercial cat food has a long list of ingredients, there’s more for your cat to react to.

For foods with long lists of synthetic supplements at the end, you might want to question the quality of the main ingredients. Low-quality cat foods often have long lists of supplements because the nutritional integrity of the main ingredients becomes compromised during processing (or it was never very high to begin with). Natural sources of nutrients are always preferable.

Does Your Cat Need a Veterinarian-Prescribed Diet?

Not necessarily.

Veterinary diets do exist for sensitive stomachs and dietary intolerances, but they aren’t always the best solution. Many of these products use hydrolyzed protein to minimize the risk of triggering food allergies, but they may also contain higher concentrations of carbohydrates than is optimal.

Rather than spending a small fortune on a veterinary formula from Purina One, Hill’s Science Diet, or Royal Canin, look for a premium cat food made with a single source of high-quality animal protein that is low in carbohydrates and highly digestible. Your veterinarian can recommend high-quality commercial diets for your cat.

You may also want to consider fresh or wet food versus dry food.

Though many pet parents prefer dry food for its convenience and affordability, wet food may be a better option to help stop vomiting. Compared to dry food, wet food is generally higher in protein, lower in carbohydrates, and richer in moisture, making it more palatable and digestible for many cats.

In addition to performing our own qualitative analysis of the brands reviewed here, we submitted samples for analysis at an ISO 17025 certified food testing and analysis lab.

We bought the products at full retail price, and the entire testing process was funded by All About Cats without direct input or influence from the companies involved.

Analytical testing in a food chemistry lab gives us the exact macronutrient and micronutrient content of each recipe. The tests also look at microbial content, yeast, mold, and heavy metals, helping you ensure that you’re only putting the best in your cat’s bowl.

To access the lab reports for each food reviewed here, click the “view lab report” link in the product review.

Our Top Picks For Best Rated Cat Food To Stop Vomiting

The key to preventing vomiting in cats is to choose a diet that is highly digestible. It should also be free from allergy-inducing ingredients and artificial additives.

Here are the cat food options that we like.

#1 Overall Best: Smalls Fresh Ground Other Bird

ENTER “ALLABOUTCATS” TO GET 30% OFF YOUR FIRST ORDER

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First 5 Ingredients: Turkey Thigh, Turkey Liver, Green Beans, Peas, Kale

Made with human-grade ingredients and prepared in small batches, Smalls Human-Grade Fresh Food is our top pick for cats who suffer from vomiting. Made with real animal proteins and other natural ingredients, Smalls fresh food is a high-quality and nutritious diet any cat would be lucky to have.

This particular formula features real turkey as the main ingredient, supplemented by turkey liver. You’ll also find green beans, peas, and kale on the list as natural sources for key nutrients.

Smalls fresh food uses highly digestible proteins and wholesome natural ingredients. Their foods are completely free from artificial additives and by-product meals, making them a great choice for cats with food sensitivities or other digestive issues.

If your cat doesn’t like turkey, Smalls also offers chicken, beef, and fish recipes. All four of their formulas come in two textures as well – pate or minced.

Ingredients:

Turkey Thigh, Turkey Liver, Green Beans, Peas, Kale, Tricalcium Phosphate, Canola Oil, Choline Chloride, Potassium Chloride, Salt, Taurine, Magnesium Sulfate, Niacinamide, Ferrous Sulfate, Zinc Sulfate, Vitamin E Supplement, Thiamine Mononitrate (Vitamin B1), Calcium Pantothenate (Vitamin B5), Copper Sulfate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride (Vitamin B6), Manganese Sulfate, Riboflavin (Vitamin B2), Potassium Iodide, Folic Acid, Biotin (Vitamin B7), Vitamin B12 Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement

Guaranteed Analysis

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Crude Protein: 16%
Crude Fat: 8.5%
Crude Fiber: 1.5%
Moisture: 72%

Dry Matter Basis

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Protein: 57.14%
Fat: 30.36%
Fiber: 5.36%
Carbs: 7.14%

Caloric Weight Basis

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Protein: 41.4%
Fat: 53.42%
Carbs: 5.18%

What We Liked:

  • Made with human-grade ingredients
  • Rich in real animal protein
  • High in moisture, low in carbohydrates
  • Free from gluten, grains, and fillers

What We Didn’t Like:

  • Fairly expensive compared to other options
  • Not pre-portioned like some fresh cat foods

#2 Runner Up: Stella & Chewy’s Chick Chick Chicken Dinner Morsels Freeze-Dried Raw Cat Food

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First 5 Ingredients: Chicken (Ground With Bone), Chicken Liver, Chicken Gizzard, Pumpkin Seed, Potassium Chloride

Made with high-quality raw ingredients, this cat food is gently freeze-dried to render it shelf-stable without compromising its nutritional integrity. Simply measure out ½ cup for every 6 pounds of your cat’s body weight and soak the food in water or broth until softened.

If your cat tolerates chicken, this freeze-dried raw formula offers high levels of quality animal protein from a single source. The combination of fresh muscle meat, organs, and ground bone makes this a species-appropriate choice, as long as you rehydrate it before feeding to add moisture

For cats sensitive to chicken, Stella & Chewy’s offers a variety of other flavors including turkey, duck, rabbit, and fish.

Ingredients:

Chicken (Ground With Bone), Chicken Liver, Chicken Gizzard, Pumpkin Seed, Potassium Chloride, Sodium Phosphate, Choline Chloride, Fenugreek Seed, Dried Pediococcus Acidilactici Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus Acidophilus Fermentation Product, Dried Bifidobacterium Longum Fermentation Product, Dried Bacillus Coagulans Fermentation Product, Taurine, Tocopherols (Preservative), Dandelion, Dried Kelp, Zinc Proteinate, Iron Proteinate, Vitamin A Supplement, Vitamin E Supplement, Niacin Supplement, Copper Proteinate, Riboflavin Supplement, Sodium Selenite, D-Calcium Pantothenate, Biotin, Manganese Proteinate, Thiamine Mononitrate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Folic Acid, Vitamin B12 Supplement.

Guaranteed Analysis

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Crude Protein: 45%
Crude Fat: 25%
Crude Fiber: 5%
Moisture: 5%

Dry Matter Basis

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Protein: 47.37%
Fat: 26.32%
Fiber: 5.26%
Carbs: 21.05%

Caloric Weight Basis

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Protein: 35.8%
Fat: 48.3%
Carbs: 15.91%

What We Liked:

  • Contains fresh muscle meat, organs, and ground bone
  • Made with a single source of quality animal protein
  • Supplemented with probiotics for healthy digestion
  • Made in the USA with cage-free poultry

What We Didn’t Like:

  • Expensive, about $4 per day
  • Must be rehydrated to supply moisture

#3 Best Ethically-Sourced: Open Farm Pasture-Raised Lamb Dry Food

Enter “AAC20” To Get 20% Off Your First Auto-Ship Order

Read Our Full Brand Review

First 5 Ingredients: Humanely Raised Lamb, Ocean Whitefish Meal, Herring Meal, Garbanzo Beans (Chickpeas), Red Lentils

When it comes to the best cat food to prevent vomiting, quality ingredients are a must, and this Open Farm dry food formula has them in spades. With humanely-raised lamb as the first ingredient, followed by ocean whitefish meal and herring meal, this formula is packed with animal protein.

In addition to being rich in animal-based protein, this recipe contains herring oil as a rich source of omega-3 fatty acids. Sunflower oil, which appears further down the list, is rich in omega-6 fatty acids.

What makes this recipe particularly good for cats who struggle with vomiting is that it contains novel animal proteins without any hard-to-digest grains, fillers, or artificial preservatives. This recipe is a little higher in carbohydrates than we’d like, but it is free from corn, wheat, and soy.

Ingredients:

Humanely Raised Lamb, Ocean Whitefish Meal, Herring Meal, Garbanzo Beans (Chickpeas), Red Lentils, Herring Oil (preserved with mixed tocopherols), Coconut Oil (preserved with mixed tocopherols), Green Lentils, Pumpkin, Natural Flavor, Non-GMO Cranberries, Dried Chicory Root Extract, Choline Chloride, Apples, Dandelion Greens, Salt, Taurine, Turmeric, Sunflower Oil, Dried Yucca Schidigera Extract, Mixed Tocopherols (a natural preservative), Calcium Carbonate, Zinc Proteinate, Iron Proteinate, Copper Proteinate, Manganese Proteinate, Sodium Selenite, Calcium Iodate, Vitamin E Supplement, Thiamine Mononitrate, Niacin Supplement, D-Calcium Pantothenate, Biotin, Vitamin A Acetate, Riboflavin Supplement, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Folic Acid, Tricalcium Phosphate, Rosemary Extract.

Guaranteed Analysis

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Crude Protein: 37%
Crude Fat: 18%
Crude Fiber: 3%
Moisture: 10%

Dry Matter Basis

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Protein: 41.11%
Fat: 20%
Fiber: 3.33%
Carbs: 35.56%

Caloric Weight Basis

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Protein: 32.83%
Fat: 38.78%
Carbs: 28.39%

What We Liked:

  • Pasture-raised lamb is the primary ingredient
  • Herring oil provides a rich source of omega-3 fatty acids
  • Highly digestible
  • No fillers, by-products, or vaguely named ingredients

What We Didn’t Like:

  • Not a single-source protein formula
  • Contains a significant number of plant-based ingredients
  • Doesn’t contain the moisture your cat needs

#4 Best Wet Cat Food: Wellness CORE Digestive Health Chicken Pate Recipe

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First 5 Ingredients: Chicken, Chicken Liver, Chicken Broth, Turkey, Ground Flaxseed

Wellness is known for their life stage- and lifestyle-specific cat food formulas. The CORE line of cat foods is protein-focused and free from grains and artificial additives. Within the CORE product line, Wellness offers six recipes formulated specifically for digestive health.

This paté is primarily chicken-based, featuring fresh chicken and chicken liver at the top of the list. These ingredients are supplemented with additional animal-based protein from fresh turkey. Salmon oil is the main added fat and a excellent source of skin- and coat-supporting omega-3 fatty acids.

What makes this recipe a particuarly good choice for cats that struggle with vomiting is the inclusion of prebiotic fibers like apple powder and pumpkin powder. Prebiotic fiber helps improve your cat’s digestion by providing food for the beneficial bacteria in their gut. The fact that the food is free from artificial additives, beans, and legumes helps improve the digestibility as well.

If you’re looking for a highly digestible cat food to help resolve your cat’s upset stomach and other GI issues, the CORE Digestive Health line from Wellness is worth considering.

Ingredients

Chicken, Chicken Liver, Chicken Broth, Turkey, Ground Flaxseed, Potassium Chloride, Apple Powder, Cranberry Powder, Pumpkin Powder, Taurine, Salmon Oil (Preserved With Mixed Tocopherols), Inulin, Choline Chloride, Cassia Gum, Xanthan Gum, Salt, Magnesium Sulfate, Iron Proteinate, Zinc Proteinate, Blueberry Powder, Papaya Powder, Pomegranate Powder, Vitamin E Supplement, Peppermint Leaf Powder, Cinnamon, Fennel Powder, Thiamine Mononitrate, Copper Proteinate, Manganese Proteinate, Sodium Selenite, Niacin Supplement, D-Calcium Pantothenate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Riboflavin Supplement, Vitamin A Supplement, Biotin, Potassium Iodide, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Folic Acid.

Guaranteed Analysis

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Crude Protein: 10%
Crude Fat: 7%
Crude Fiber: 1%
Moisture: 78%
Ash: 2.5%

Dry Matter Basis

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Protein: 45.45%
Fat: 31.82%
Fiber: 4.55%
Carbs: 6.82%

Caloric Weight Basis

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Protein: 35.09%
Fat: 59.65%
Carbs: 5.26%

What We Liked:

  • Highly digestible for most cats
  • Top four ingredients are all animal-based
  • Supplemented with prebiotic fibers
  • Relies primarily on animal protein and fat

What We Didn’t Like:

  • Expensive, priced over $0.70 per ounce
  • Carb content is a little high, over 15%

#5 Best Dry Cat Food: Blue Buffalo Sensitive Stomach Chicken Recipe Adult Dry Cat Food

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First 5 Ingredients: Deboned Chicken, Chicken Meal, Brown Rice, Oatmeal, Barley

If your cat prefers kibble to canned food, this Blue Buffalo Sensitive Stomach cat food might be a good option. It features real chicken as the first ingredient, supplemented with additional protein from chicken meal and menhaden fish meal.

This formula is designed specifically for cats with sensitive stomachs, so it contains high-quality ingredients like real animal-based protein, whole grains, and healthy animal-based fats. You’ll also find prebiotics and probiotics on the list. These ingredients have very long names and a variety are included – this is what makes the ingredient list appear so long.

What makes Blue Buffalo products unique is the inclusion of their proprietary LifeSource Bits. These contain a rich blend of antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals to help support your cat’s overall health. They also help support healthy skin, a strong immune system, and healthy digestion.

Ingredients:

Deboned Chicken, Chicken Meal, Brown Rice, Oatmeal, Barley, Pea Protein, Peas, Chicken Fat (Preserved With Mixed Tocopherols), Dried Egg Product, Natural Flavor, Flaxseed (Source Of Omega 6 Fatty Acids), Pea Fiber, Menhaden Fish Meal, Fish Oil (Source Of Omega 3 Fatty Acids), DL-Methionine, Calcium Sulfate, Fructooligosaccharide, Calcium Chloride, Calcium Carbonate, Choline Chloride, Potassium Chloride, Potatoes, Dried Chicory Root, Taurine, Dehydrated Alfalfa Meal, Alfalfa Nutrient Concentrate, Salt, Cranberries, Preserved With Mixed Tocopherols, Sweet Potatoes, Carrots, Vegetable Juice For Color, Ferrous Sulfate, Niacin (Vitamin B3), Iron Amino Acid Chelate, Zinc Amino Acid Chelate, etc…

Guaranteed Analysis

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Crude Protein: 32%
Crude Fat: 16%
Crude Fiber: 3.5%
Moisture: 9%

Dry Matter Basis

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Protein: 35.16%
Fat: 17.58%
Fiber: 3.85%
Carbs: 43.41%

Caloric Weight Basis

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Protein: 29%
Fat: 35.21%
Carbs: 35.79%

What We Liked:

  • Made with high-quality, natural ingredients
  • Supplemented with prebiotics and probiotics
  • Nutritionally balanced and easy to digest

What We Didn’t Like:

  • Not a single-source protein recipe
  • Contains some gluten (barley)

#6 Best For Senior Cats: Halo Holistic Chicken & Chicken Liver Recipe Grain-Free Senior Dry Cat Food Food

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First 5 Ingredients: Chicken, Potato Protein, Dried Peas, Dried Potatoes, Tapioca

Our top pick for the best cat food for older cats that vomit is Halo Holistic Chicken & Chicken Liver Recipe Grain-Free Senior Dry Cat Food. This recipe features real chicken as the first ingredient.

In addition to being formulated for senior cats, this recipe is designed to support your cat’s digestive health. It is made with wholesome natural ingredients, not by-products and rendered meat meals. It is also highly digestible, thanks to the lack of artificial additives.

This recipe is a great pick for older cats whose metabolism is slowing down. It provides plenty of digestible protein and fiber to support healthy digestion. It is also supplemented with the antioxidants your cat needs for optimal health.

Ingredients:

Chicken, Potato Protein, Dried Peas, Dried Potatoes, Tapioca, Soy Protein Concentrate, Chicken Liver, Chicken Fat (Preserved With Mixed Tocopherols), Dried Egg Product, Natural Flavor, Pea Fiber, Flaxseed, Calcium Sulfate, Salmon Oil, Dicalcium Phosphate, Dried Bacillus Coagulans Fermentation Product, Dried Blueberries, Dried Cranberries, Dried Carrots, Dried Sweet Potatoes, Salt, Inulin, Choline Chloride, Taurine, Vitamins (Vitamin E Supplement, Niacin Supplement, Thiamine Mononitrate, etc…

Guaranteed Analysis

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Crude Protein: 30%
Crude Fat: 10%
Crude Fiber: 5%
Moisture: 10%
Ash: 7%

Dry Matter Basis

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Protein: 33.33%
Fat: 11.11%
Fiber: 5.56%
Carbs: 42.22%

Caloric Weight Basis

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Protein: 32.51%
Fat: 26.32%
Carbs: 41.18%

What We Liked:

  • Formulated to support digestive health
  • Rich in omega-3 fatty acids
  • Highly digestible, no artificial additives

What We Didn’t Like:

  • Contains some plant-based protein
  • Fairly expensive compared to other options

Final Thoughts

Vomiting is a common GI issue in cats. In many cases, it is mild and resolves itself in a few days. Other times, however, it can last for weeks and become a much more serious health problem.

Take your cat to the vet if vomiting has become problematic or if you notice additional symptoms (especially blood in the vomit). Your vet may recommend a bland diet for a few days to give your cat’s tummy a break, but you should also consider a permanent switch to a higher quality, more digestible food to prevent the issue from recurring.

A new diet of low-carb, allergen free, and all-natural food could help to calm your cat’s tummy and stop the vomiting. Work with your vet to come up with the best treatment plan to stop your cat’s vomiting.

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Frequently Asked Questions

Should cats eat after vomiting?

If your cat vomits once or twice but appears to be well otherwise, you still might want to remove food for a few hours. After giving your cat’s stomach a chance to rest, you may reintroduce food or try a bland diet of cooked, unseasoned chicken breast. Make sure your cat has access to fresh water at all times.

Why is my cat throwing up undigested food?

If your cat is throwing up undigested food, it is likely regurgitation and not vomiting. Regurgitation often happens when a cat eats too much too quickly. The regurgitated food will be undigested and will generally be regurgitated in a long, tubular shape.

Why is my cat vomiting every day?

It is normal for cats to throw up occasionally but more than three times a month is abnormal. If your cat is vomiting daily, you should not ignore the issue. It could be something simple like hairballs, but it could also indicate that your cat has a serious illness. Either way, talk to your vet as soon as possible.

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About Kate Barrington

Kate Barrington holds a Bachelor’s degree in English and is the published author of several self-help books and nutrition guides. Also an avid dog lover and adoring owner of three cats, Kate’s love for animals has led her to a successful career as a freelance writer specializing in pet care and nutrition. Kate is also a blogger for a number of organic and natural food companies as well as a columnist for several pet magazines.